(65) 64712744|info@boneclinic.com.sg

Orthopaedic Conditions

With our Professional Orthopaedic Surgeons, Dr. Kevin Yip and Dr Ambrose Yung has more than 25 years experience in treating orthopedic problems ranging from common orthopedic problem, sport injuries to degenerative changes of orthopedic problem. Be assured that you will be receiving professional treatments and Cost Effective that suit your needs.

We are specialised in treating the following conditions:

Speak to our friendly patient relation officer. Call us at +65 64712744 or Email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg.

Ankle Sprained Clinic

We are specialized in treating Acute and Chronic Ankle Injury. Cure your Ankle Sprained Today! Call us at +65 64712744 or SMS +65 92357641 for Appointment.

A sprained ankle is an injury that occurs when you roll, twist or turn your ankle in an awkward way. This can stretch or tear the tough bands of tissue (ligaments) that help hold your ankle bones together.

Ligaments help stabilize joints, preventing excessive movement. A sprained ankle occurs when the ligaments are forced beyond their normal range of motion. Most sprained ankles involve injuries to the ligaments on the outer side of the ankle.

Treatment for a sprained ankle depends on the severity of the injury. Although self-care measures and over-the-counter pain medications may be all you need, a medical evaluation might be necessary to reveal how badly you’ve sprained your ankle and to put you on the right path to recovery.

Symptoms:

Signs and symptoms of a sprained ankle include:

  • Pain, especially when you bear weight on the affected foot
  • Swelling and, sometimes, bruising
  • Restricted range of motion

Some people hear or feel a “pop” at the time of injury.

When to see a doctor

Call your doctor if you have pain and swelling in your ankle and you suspect a sprain. Self-care measures may be all you need, but talk to your doctor to discuss whether you should have your ankle evaluated. If your signs and symptoms are severe, it’s possible you may have broken a bone in your ankle or lower leg.

Ankle Sprain

Ankle Sprain

Causes Sprained Ankle

A sprain occurs when your ankle is forced to move out of its normal position, which can cause one or more of the ankle’s ligaments to stretch or tear.

Examples of situations that can result in an ankle sprain include:

  • A fall that causes your ankle to twist
  • Landing awkwardly on your foot after jumping or pivoting
  • Walking or exercising on an uneven surface

Risk Factors:

Factors that increase your risk of a sprained ankle include:

  • Sports participation. Ankle sprains are a common sports injury. Sports that require rolling or twisting your foot, such as basketball, tennis, football, soccer and trail running, can make you vulnerable to spraining your ankle, particularly if you’re overweight. Playing sports on an uneven surface also can increase your risk.
  • Prior ankle injury. Once you’ve sprained your ankle, or had another type of ankle injury, you’re more likely to sprain it again.

Complications:

If a sprained ankle is left untreated, if you engage in activities too soon after spraining your ankle or if you sprain your ankle repeatedly, you may experience the following complications:

  • Chronic pain
  • Chronic ankle joint instability
  • Early-onset arthritis in that joint

Many people don’t seek medical attention for mild ankle sprains. If your sprain is severe, however, your family doctor may refer you to a doctor who specializes in sports medicine or orthopedic surgery.

What you can do

You may want to write a list that includes:

  • Detailed descriptions of your symptoms
  • Information about medical problems you’ve had, especially past ankle injuries
  • Information about the medical problems of your parents or siblings
  • All the medications and dietary supplements you take
  • Questions you want to ask the doctor

Diagnosis:

During the physical exam, your doctor will check for points of tenderness. He or she will move the joint in a variety of ways to check your range of motion and to see if any particular position or movement causes pain.

If the injury is severe, your doctor may recommend one or more of the following imaging scans to rule out a broken bone or to more precisely evaluate the soft tissue damage:

  • X-ray. During an X-ray, a small amount of radiation passes through your body to produce images of your internal structures. This test is good for evaluating bones, but is less effective at visualizing soft tissues. Tiny cracks or stress fractures in bones may not show up, especially at first, on regular X-rays.
  • Bone scan. For a bone scan, a technician will inject a small amount of radioactive material into an intravenous line. The radioactive material is attracted to your bones, especially the parts of your bones that have been damaged. Damaged areas show up as bright spots on an image taken by a scanner. Bone scans are good at detecting stress fractures.
  • Computerized tomography (CT). CT scans are useful because they can reveal more detail about the bones of the joint. CT scans take X-rays from many different angles and combine them to make cross-sectional images of internal structures of your body.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRIs use radio waves and a strong magnetic field to produce detailed images of internal structures. This technology is exceptionally good at visualizing soft tissue injuries.

 Get treatment on your Sprained Ankle Today! Call us at +65 64712744 or SMS +65 92357641 for Appointment.

Spinal Stenosis

Are you suffering from Spinal Stenosis? Having lower back pain with leg pain and numbness? You are at the right place. Get professional opinion and treatment on your Spinal Stenosis. Call us for appointment today. Tel: +65 64712744 or SMS to: +65 92357641 (24 Hours Hotline).

There are two types of spinal stenosis: lumbar stenosis and cervical stenosis. While lumbar spinal stenosis is more common, cervical spinal stenosis is often more dangerous because it involves compression of the spinal cord, as explained below in more detail.

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis VS Cervical Spinal Stenosis

  • In lumbar stenosis, the spinal nerve roots in the lower back are compressed, or choked, and this can produce symptoms of sciatica — tingling, weakness or numbness that radiates from the low back and into the buttocks and legs – especially with activity.
  • Spinal stenosis pain in the neck (cervical spinal stenosis) can be far more dangerous by compressing the spinal cord. Spinal cord stenosis may lead to serious symptoms, including major body weakness or even paralysis. Such severe spinal stenosis symptoms are virtually impossible in the lumbar spine, however, as the spinal cord is not present in the lumbar spine.

In rare cases, lumbar stenosis can go no further than to produce severe persistent disabling pain and even weakness in the legs. Most cases of stenosis in the lumbar spine, however, have pain that radiates into the leg(s) with walking, and that pain will be relieved with sitting.

Spinal Stenosis

Spinal Stenosis in Older Patients

Spinal stenosis is related to degeneration in the spine and usually will become significant in the 5th decade of life and extend throughout every subsequent age group. Most patients first visit their doctor with symptoms of spinal stenosis at about age 60 or so. Patients need only seek treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis if they no longer wish to live with significant activity limitations, such as leg pain and/or difficulty with walking.

Spinal stenosis can occur in a variety of ways in the spine. Approximately 75% of cases of spinal stenosis occur in the lumbar spine (low back), which is called lumbar spinal stenosis, and most will affect the sciatic nerve which runs along the back of the leg. When this happens, it is commonly called sciatica.

Common Symptom of Spinal Stenosis

Leg pain with walking (claudication) can be caused by either arterial circulatory insufficiency (vascular claudication) or from spinal stenosis (neurogenic or pseudo-claudication). Leg pain from either condition will go away with rest, but with spinal stenosis the patient usually has to sit down for a few minutes to ease the leg and often low back pain, whereas leg pain from vascular claudication will go away if the patient simply stops walking.

Although occasionally the leg pain and stenosis symptoms will come on acutely, they generally develop over the course of several years. The longer a patient with spinal stenosis stands or walks, the worse the leg pain will get.

Common Treatment of Spinal Stenosis

Depending on the severity of symptoms, spinal stenosis can often be managed through non-surgical treatments.

The three most common non-surgical spinal stenosis treatments include:

  • Exercise
  • Activity modification
  • Epidural injections

Fortunately, spinal stenosis surgery outcomes for decompression can be among the most rewarding surgical methods used on the spine (second only to removal of some herniated discs). Generally patients do well after decompression surgery and are able to increase their activity following recovery from spinal stenosis surgery. Many patients have a better walking tolerance following back surgery for spinal stenosis.

Are you suffering from Spinal Stenosis? Having lower back pain with leg pain and numbness? You are at the right place. Get professional opinion and treatment on your Spinal Stenosis. Call us for appointment today. Tel: +65 64712744 or SMS to: +65 92357641 (24 Hours Hotline).

Child (Pediatric) Orthopaedics

Pediatric Orthopaedics (Child Orthopaedics) are specialized in traumatic deformities of the spine, bone fractures and extremities in children and young adults. Our clinics are located at the Gleneagles Medical Centre. Our pediatric orthopaedic surgeons are widely recognized both regionally and nationally for innovative surgical treatments, as well as conservative approaches to a wide variety of orthopaedic problems.

Child Orthopaedic

Child Orthopaedic

Among the most-common conditions we treat are:

  • Spinal deformities such as scoliosis, kyphosis, spondylolisthesis, and spinal trauma

  • Pediatric and adolescent sports injuries

  • Foot and hip development problems such as club foot and hip dysplasia

  • Lower extremity deformities such as knock knees, bowleggedness, and rotational problems

  • Upper extremity deformities, whether congenital or developmental

  • Leg length discrepancy

  • Benign and malignant tumors

  • Fractures and other trauma due to Sports

  • Cerebral palsy

  • Limb salvage

  • Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas

Our pediatric orthopaedic service receives patient inquires and consultations from around the world. Besides our busy operative practice, we are known for recommending non-operative methods or small incision techniques when possible to manage complex pediatric orthopaedic problems.

As a child’s body grows, problems related to specific stages of bone and muscle development may arise. Child Orthopaedics is the medical field concerned with the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders in children from infancy to 18 years of age. Many orthopaedic conditions are unique to a child’s age, and appropriate treatment can often correct problems early in life. Children orthopaedic fields including:

To set an appointment, please call us +65 64712744 or SMS to +65 92357641 (24 Hours Hotline)

Hip Pain

Are you frustrated with your Hip pain that is not getting better? Are you experiencing Hip discomfort after prolong walking, squatting or running? Walking in limping or imbalance? You are in the right place! We certainly able to help with our innovative and non-invasive (non-surgical) form of treatment. Get your hip check today. Call us at (65) 6471 2744 or Email to info@boneclinic.com.sg to schedule for an appointment

HIP PAIN CLINIC

HIP PAIN CLINIC

Hip pain refers to pain in and around the hip area. The pain in this area can be from arthritis, weak muscles or bursitis. The hip is the largest joint in the body and when it is not working well your life can be very limited.

The hip joint attaches the leg to the torso of the body. In the hip joint, the head of the thighbone (femur) swivels in a socket, called the acetabulum, that is made up of pelvic bones. While many causes of hip pain can arise from the joint itself, there are numerous structures surrounding the hip that can also be the source of pain.

Trauma is often the cause of hip pain, but any source of inflammation may cause pain in the hip area. Pain is one of the symptoms of inflammation, along with swelling, warmth, and redness; together these are signals that a problem may exist.

Hip pain is common problem, and it can be confusing because there are many causes. It is important to make an accurate diagnosis of the cause of your symptoms so that appropriate treatment can be directed at the underlying problem. If you have hip pain, some common conditions include:

When do you need to call us about your hip pain?

If you are unsure of the cause of your symptoms, or if you do not know the specific treatment recommendations for your condition, you should seek medical attention. Treatment of hip pain must be directed at the specific cause of your problem. Some signs that you should be seen by a doctor include:

    • Inability to walk comfortably on the affected side
    • Injury that causes deformity around the joint
    • Hip pain that occurs at night or while resting
    • Hip pain that persists beyond a few days
    • Inability to bend the hip
    • Swelling of the hip or the thigh area
    • Signs of an infection, including fever, redness, warmth
    • Any other unusual symptoms

What are the best treatments for hip pain?

Treatment depends entirely on the cause of the problem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that you understand the cause of your symptoms before embarking on a treatment program. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, or the severity of your condition, you should seek medical advice before beginning any treatment plan.

Read more about Transient Synovitis Hip in Children

Read more about Acetabular Labrum Tear

CURE YOUR HIP PAIN TODAY. GET A HIP SPECIALIST TO RULE OUT THE CAUSES AND CURE OF YOUR HIP PAIN. CALL (65) 6471 2744 – 24 Hours OR EMAIL TO info@boneclinic.com.sg TO GET AN APPOINTMENT

Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy (PRP)

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)

In many recent years, much has been written about a preparation called platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and its potential effectiveness in the treatment of sports injuries.

Many famous athletes — Tiger Woods, tennis star Rafael Nadal, and several others — have received PRP for various problems, such as sprained knees and chronic tendon injuries. These types of conditions have typically been treated with medications, physical therapy, or even surgery. Some athletes have credited PRP with their being able to return more quickly to competition.

Even though PRP has received extensive publicity, there are still lingering questions about it, such as:

  • What exactly is platelet-rich plasma?
  • How does it work?
  • What conditions are being treated with PRP?
  • Is PRP treatment effective?

What Is Platelet-rich Plasma (PRP)?

Although blood is mainly a liquid (called plasma), it also contains small solid components (red cells, white cells, and platelets.) The platelets are best known for their importance in clotting blood. However, platelets also contain hundreds of proteins called growth factors which are very important in the healing of injuries.

PRP is plasma with many more platelets than what is typically found in blood. The concentration of platelets — and, thereby, the concentration of growth factors — can be 5 to 10 times greater (or richer) than usual.

To develop a PRP preparation, blood must first be drawn from a patient. The platelets are separated from other blood cells and their concentration is increased during a process called centrifugal. Then the increased concentration of platelets is combined with the remaining blood

How Does PRP Work?

Although it is not exactly clear how PRP works, laboratory studies have shown that the increased concentration of growth factors in PRP can potentially speed up the healing process.

To speed healing, the injury site is treated with the PRP preparation. This can be done in one of two ways:

  • PRP can be carefully injected into the injured area. For example, in Achilles tendonitis, a condition commonly seen in runners and tennis players, the heel cord can become swollen, inflamed, and painful. A mixture of PRP and local anesthetic can be injected directly into this inflamed tissue. Afterwards, the pain at the area of injection may actually increase for the first week or two, and it may be several weeks before the patient feels a beneficial effect.
  • PRP may also be used to improve healing after surgery for some injuries. For example, an athlete with a completely torn heel cord may require surgery to repair the tendon. Healing of the torn tendon can possibly be improved by treating the injured area with PRP during surgery. This is done by preparing the PRP in a special way that allows it to actually be stitched into torn tissues.

What Conditions are Treated with PRP? Is It Effective?

Research studies are currently being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of PRP treatment. At this time, the results of these studies are inconclusive because the effectiveness of PRP therapy can vary. Factors that can influence the effectiveness of PRP treatment include:

  • The area of the body being treated
  • The overall health of the patient
  • Whether the injury is acute (such as from a fall) or chronic (an injury developing over time)

Chronic Tendon Injuries

According to the research studies currently reported, PRP is most effective in the treatment of chronic tendon injuries, especially tennis elbow, a very common injury of the tendons on the outside of the elbow.

An injection of PRP is used to treat tennis elbow.

The use of PRP for other chronic tendon injuries — such as chronic Achilles tendonitis or inflammation of the patellar tendon at the knee (jumper’s knee) is promising. However, it is difficult to say at this time that PRP therapy is any more effective than traditional treatment of these problems.

Acute Ligament and Muscle Injuries

Much of the publicity PRP therapy has received has been about the treatment of acute sports injuries, such as ligament and muscle injuries. PRP has been used to treat professional athletes with common sports injuries like pulled hamstring muscles in the thigh and knee sprains. There is no definitive scientific evidence, however, that PRP therapy actually improves the healing process in these types of injuries.

Surgery

More recently, PRP has been used during certain types of surgery to help tissues heal. It was first thought to be beneficial in shoulder surgery to repair torn rotator cuff tendons. However, the results so far show little or no benefit when PRP is used in these types of surgical procedures.

Surgery to repair torn knee ligaments, especially the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is another area where PRP has been applied. At this time, there appears to be little or no benefit from using PRP in this instance.

Knee Arthritis

Some initial research is being done to evaluate the effectiveness of PRP in the treatment of the arthritic knee. It is still too soon to determine if this form of treatment will be any more effective than current treatment methods.

Fractures

PRP has been used in a very limited way to speed the healing of broken bones. So far, it has shown no significant benefit.

Summary:

Treatment with platelet-rich plasma holds great promise. Currently, however, the research studies to back up the claims in the media are lacking. Although PRP does appear to be effective in the treatment of chronic tendon injuries about the elbow, the medical community needs more scientific evidence before it can determine whether PRP therapy is truly effective in other conditions.

Even though the success of PRP therapy is still questionable, the risks associated with it are minimal: There may be increased pain at the injection site, but the incidence of other problems — infection, tissue damage, nerve injuries — appears to be no different from that associated with cortisone injections.

If you are considering treatment with PRP, be sure to check your eligibility with your health insurance carrier. Few insurance plans, including workers’ compensation plans, provide even partial reimbursement.

To schedule for an Appointment, please call us at +65 6471 2744 or SMS to: +65 9235 7641 (24 Hours)

Low Back Pain Management and Treatment

Be Pain Free from Back Pain!

Call us at (65) 6471 2744 or Email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg to schedule for an appointment.

What is Low back pain?

Low back pain can happen to anywhere in your spine, below the ribs and above the legs. The lower back connects the upper and lower body. It bears the most of your body’s weight. Due to this, your back is the most commonly injured compare to the rest of the body and you can easily hurt your back if you life heavy loads, overstretch or twisting. Everyone will have low back pain one time in their life.

What causes Low back pain?

Causes of low back could be injury or degeneration disease.

Cause Low back pain include:

What are the low back pain symptoms?

The symptoms of the low back pain varies with individuals. Some people may feel constant dull or sharp back pain. Some people may feel pain in a small area or a broad area. Some may feel muscle spasms to the back.

Sometimes low back pain can cause symptoms to the legs or thighs, such as pain, numbness, or tingling sensation over the thigh area and sometimes the low back symptoms may extend below the knee to the calf.

Cauda equina syndrome is a rare but serious low back pain problem. This is a condition whereby the nerves at the end of the spinal cord are squeezed. Seek specialist treatment if you feel weakness or numbness in both of your legs or you could not control your bladder or bowel.

Seek specialist treatment if your low back pain does not go away with rest. If you ignore your low back pain, it may result to chronic back pain.

How is low back pain diagnosed?

Our specialist will ask questions about you past medical history. He will examine your spine carefully.

If your low back pain lasted more than four weeks, or if our specialist suspect that you may have more than muscle pain after the examination, he may refer you for an MRI investigation.

How is it treated?

Minor low back pain will improve after resting for a day or two.

Other treatments for your low back pain includes:

  • Physiotherapy – Strengthening to your back muscles.
  • Epidural injection
  • Spinal manipulation
  • Back surgery for disc problem that may lead to nerve problem.

Low Back Pain Video:

How can you prevent low back pain from returning?

If you’ve had low back pain before, the chances of getting low back pain again is higher.

To prevent future low back pain, you can follow these activities:

  • Maintain good posture.
  • Low impact exercise like walk or swim.
  • Avoid wearing high heeled shoes.
  • Sleep on your side.
  • Watch your weight. Being too heavy, especially around your waist, puts extra stress on your back.
  • Avoid lifting heavy loads.

If you sit or stand for long periods at work:

  • Pay attention to your posture. Sit or stand up straight, with your shoulders back.
  • Make sure your chair has good back support.
  • Take regular breaks to walk around.

If your work involves a lot of bending, reaching, or lifting:

  • Use good techniques for lifting.

Cure Your Back Pain Today! Call us at +65 6471 2744 or SMS to +65 9235 7641 for an appointment

Achilles Tendon Rupture

Are you suffering from Achilles Injury? Not being able to walk normally and tip-toeing? You are at the Right Place. Get immediate treatment on your Achilles Injury today. Call +65 64712744 or SMS to +65 92357641 for Appointment.

A total rupture of the achilles tendon is a complete tear of the tendon and typically affects men over the age of 40 involved in recreational sport.

A complete rupture of the achilles tendon is not always recognized at the time of injury, however it is very important it is treated properly as soon as possible to increase the chances of a good recovery.

Symptoms

Symptoms include a sudden sharp pain in the achilles tendon which is often described as if being physically struck by an object or implement. A load snapping noise or bang may also be heard at the time. A gap of 4 to 5 cm in the tendon can be felt which may be less obvious later as swelling increases.

After a short while the athlete may be able to walk again but without the power to push off with the foot. There will be a significant loss of strength in the injured leg and the patient will be unable to stand on tip toes. There may be considerable swelling around the achilles tendon and a positive result for Thompson’s test can help confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment

If you suspect a total rupture of the achilles tendon then apply cold therapy and compression and seek medical attention as soon as possible. In most cases surgery is required and the sooner this takes place the higher the chances of success. If the injury is left longer than two days then the chances of a successful outcome decrease. Cold and compression can also be applied throughout the rehabilitation phase as swelling is likely to be an issue with such a serious injury.

A medical professional will take MRI scans to confirm the diagnosis and indicate the extent of the injury. Sometimes the leg is put in a cast and allowed to heal without surgery. This is generally not the preferred method, particularly for young active people. Surgery is the most common treatment for an achilles tendon rupture. 

You can expect to be out of competition for 6 to 9 months after achilles tendon surgery. This is increased to 12 months if the ankle is immobilized in plaster instead of operated on. There is also a greater risk of re-injury if you do not have the surgery.

A complete rupture of the achilles tendon is a serious injury and rehabilitation should be a very gradual process taking 6 to 9 months.

The following guidelines are for information purposes only. We recommend seeking professional advice before attempting any self treatment.

Aim of rehabilitation

  • To allow the tendon to heal, reducing pain swelling and inflammation.
  • To restore the tendon and muscles to their original flexibility and strength.
  • To gradually return to normal activity and training levels.

There are two methods of treatment; surgical and non surgical or conservative. The speed at which a patient can progress with the rehabilitation will vary and should at all times be done under the supervision of a qualified professional. The timescales indicated below are only a rough guide and you should always take the advice of your consultant.

Surgical approach

The surgical approach is usually the preferred one, especially for young and active people. Immediately following injury the principles of PRICE should be followed which are protection rest, ice, compression, elevation. Go as soon as you can to a sports medicine professional or accident and emergency unit. Surgery will usually be performed within 48 hours or as soon as possible.

Non surgical approach

This will follow a similar pattern to that of the surgical approach although will take a lot longer. A plaster cast will be applied in a plantar flexed position (toes and foot pointing down). Sometimes after four weeks this may be altered to allow less plantar flexion. After 8 weeks the tendon is usually healed.

Rehabilitation program

Week 1 to 8

  • A plaster cast is applied after surgery.
  • No stretching or exercise, just let it heal.
  • You may be able to work the upper body.
  • Try to do something positive, it will certainly help your state of mind.

Week 8 onwards

Stage 1 – range of motion and flexibility.

  • Place heel raises (1-2cm) in the shoes to take some of the pressure off the achilles tendon.
  • Sports massage techniques and ultrasound can aid in this process by helping to realign the new fibres in line with the tendon.
  • Active stretching. Pull your toes upwards to stretch the achilles tendon. Very gently at first and gradually build up.
  • If active stretches produce no pain then passive stretches can commence. This involves someone or something assisting in the stretching process.
  • When a full range of motion has returned (the ruptured leg is as flexible as the other leg) then a gradual strengthening programme can start.
  • Balance exercises should also be introduced as the sense of balance and positioning is often decreased after tendon or ligament ruptures and if not re-gained, can lead to future injuries. Wobble boards (balance boards) are great for this.

Sports massage can play a part in the rehabilitation of this injury by improving blood flow to the area, helping the muscles relax and become more supple.

Stage 2: Strengthen the achilles tendon and calf muscles.

  • Great care must be taken when commencing a strengthening programme. There is a fine line between strengthening the tendon and re-injuring it.
  • You can start strengthening exercises as soon as they can be tolerated. It may be a full month after the cast comes off before exercises can begin.
  • The athlete may feel a little pain when you first start these exercises. If the pain is intolerable then do not continue.
  • Gradually each day the pain should be less. The athlete should not attempt to increase the level of exercise until there is no pain during or after the exercises.
  • The strengthening exercises must be done after a gentle warm up and stretch. The muscles can be warmed up by raising the heels up and down on the toes while seated. Heat applied directly to the tendon for example by a hot water bottle can also help.
  • Flexibility training must be continued throughout.
  • Remember to apply cold therapy or ice after exercise, this will help keep inflammation down.
  • Avoid explosive or ballistic movements or this may lead to a re-rupture.

Return to fitness 

  • When the patient has gone at least a week without pain then they may begin to return to training.
  • If they feel pain when returning to training then stop. Begin each training session with a walk to warm up followed by stretching.

Day 1: walk 4 minutes jog 2 minutes repeat four times

Day 2: rest

Day 3: walk 4 minutes jog 3 minutes repeat three times

Day 4: rest

Day 5: walk 3 minutes jog 4 minutes repeat 4 times

Day 6: rest

Day 7: walk 2 minutes jog 6 minutes repeat 4 times

Continue this gradual progression until you can confidently run and resume normal training.

How long until I am back to full fitness?

  • Most athletes can expect to be out of competition for 6 to 9 months after surgery.
  • This is increased to 12 months if the achilles was immobilized in plaster instead of operated on. There is also a greater risk of re injury if the athlete does not have the surgery.

CURE YOUR ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE TODAY! CALL US AT +65 64712744 OR EMAIL TO: INFO@BONECLINIC.COM.SG FOR APPOINTMENT

Management of Bursitis

What Is Bursitis?

Bursitis is the inflammation or irritation of the bursa. The bursa is a sac filled with lubricating fluid, located between tissues such as bone, muscle, tendons, and skin, that decreases rubbing, friction, and irritation.

What Causes Bursitis?

Bursitis is most often caused by repetitive, minor impact on the area, or from a sudden, more serious injury. Age also plays a role. As tendons age they are able to tolerate stress less, are less elastic, and are easier to tear.

Overuse or injury to the joint at work or play can also increase a person’s risk of bursitis. Examples of high-risk activities include gardening, raking, carpentry, shoveling, painting, scrubbing, tennis, golf, skiing, throwing, and pitching. Incorrect posture at work or home and poor stretching or conditioning before exercise can also lead to bursitis.

An abnormal or poorly placed bone or joint (such as length differences in your legs or arthritis in a joint) can put added stress on a bursa sac, causing bursitis. Stress or inflammation from other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, psoriatic arthritis, thyroid disorders, or unusual medication reactions may also increase a person’s risk. In addition, an infection can occasionally lead to inflammation of a bursa.

Who Usually Gets Bursitis?

Bursitis is more common in adults, especially in those over 40 years of age.

 

What Parts of the Body Does Bursitis Affect?

  • Elbow
  • Shoulder
  • Hip
  • Knee
  • Achilles tendon

What Are the Symptoms of Bursitis?

The most common symptom of bursitis is pain. The pain may build up gradually or be sudden and severe, especially if calcium deposits are present. Severe loss of motion in the shoulder — called “adhesive capsulitis” or frozen shoulder — can also result from the immobility and pain associated with shoulder bursitis.

How Can I Prevent Bursitis?

If you are planning to start exercising, you will be less likely to get bursitis if you gradually build up  force and  repetitions. Stop what you are doing if unusual pain occurs.

How Is Bursitis Treated?

Bursitis can be treated in a number of ways, including:

  • Avoiding activities that aggravate the problem
  • Resting the injured area
  • Icing the area the day of the injury
  • Taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicines

If the condition does not improve in a week, see your doctor.

Your doctor can also prescribe drugs to reduce the inflammation. Corticosteroids are often used because they work quickly to decrease the inflammation and pain. Steroids  can be injected directly at the site of injury.  Injections are often, but not always, effective and can be repeated . However, multiple injections in a several month period are usually avoided due to potential side effects from the injections and the possibility of masking problems that need to be treated differently.

Physical therapy is another treatment option that is often used. This includes range-of-motion exercises and splinting (thumb, forearm, or bands).

Surgery, although rarely needed, may be an option when bursitis does not respond to the other treatment options.

Warning

Consult your doctor if you have:

  • Fever (over 102 Fahrenheit) — infection is a possibility
  • Swelling, redness, and warmth
  • General illness or multiple sites of pain
  • Inability to move the affected area

These could be signs of another problem that needs more immediate attention.

Cure your Elbow Bursitis today! Call us at +65 64712744 or Email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg for Appointment

Guide to Low Back Pain

What Is Low Back Pain?

Low back pain is a universal human experience — almost everyone has it at some point. The lower back, which starts below the ribcage, is called the lumbar region. Pain here can be intense and is one of the top causes of missed work. Fortunately, low back pain often gets better on its own. When it doesn’t, there are effective treatments.

Symptoms of Low Back Pain

Symptoms range from a dull ache to a stabbing or shooting sensation. The pain may make it hard to move or stand up straight. Acute back pain comes on suddenly, often after an injury from sports or heavy lifting. Pain that lasts more than three months is considered chronic. If your pain is not better within 72 hours, you should consult a doctor.

Symptoms That Require Urgent Care

Severe back pain after a fall or injury should be checked out by a health care professional. Other warning signs include a loss of bowel or bladder control, leg weakness, fever, and pain when coughing or urinating. If you have any of these symptoms along with your back pain, contact your doctor.

Muscle Strain or Sciatica?

The kind of back pain that follows heavy lifting or exercising too hard is often caused by muscle strain. But sometimes back pain can be related to a disc that bulges or ruptures. If a bulging or ruptured disc presses on the sciatic nerve, pain may run from the buttock down one leg. This is called sciatica.

Back Pain Culprit: Your Job

If your job involves lifting, pulling, or anything that twists the spine, it may contribute to back pain. However, sitting at a desk all day comes with risks of its own, especially if your chair is uncomfortable or you tend to slouch.

Back Pain Culprit: Your Bag

Although you may wear your purse, backpack, or briefcase over your shoulder, it is the lower back that supports the upper body — including any additional weight you carry. So an overstuffed bag can strain the lower back, especially if you carry it day after day. If you must tote a heavy load, consider switching to a wheeled briefcase.

Back Pain Culprit: Your Workout

Overdoing it at the gym or golf course is one of the most common causes of overextended muscles leading to low back pain. You’re especially vulnerable if you tend to be inactive during the work week and then spend hours at the gym or softball field on the weekend.

Back Pain Culprit: Your Posture

Mom was right when she said, “Stand up straight!” Your back supports weight best when you don’t slouch. This means sitting with good lumbar support for your lower back, shoulders back, with feet resting on a low stool. When standing, keep weight evenly balanced on both feet.

Back Pain Culprit: Herniated Disc

The spine’s vertebrae are cushioned by gel-like discs that are prone to wear and tear from aging or injuries. A weakened disc may rupture or bulge, putting pressure on the spinal nerve roots. This is known as a herniated disc and can cause intense pain.

Back Pain Culprit: Chronic Conditions

Several chronic conditions can lead to low back pain.

  • Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the space around the spinal cord, which can put pressure on the spinal nerves.
  • Spondylitis refers to chronic back pain and stiffness due to severe inflammation of the spinal joints.
  • Fibromyalgia causes widespread muscle aches, including back pain.

Who’s at Risk for Low Back Pain?

Most people get their first taste of low back pain in their 30s. The odds of additional attacks increase with age. Other reasons your low back may hurt include:

  • Being overweight
  • Inactive lifestyle
  • Jobs that require heavy lifting

Diagnosing Low Back Pain

To help your doctor diagnose the source of low back pain, be specific in describing the type of pain, when it started, related symptoms, and any history of chronic conditions. Your doctor may order X-rays, CT or MRI scans to look for damaged bones or discs, or other injuries to the spine.

Home Care for Low Back Pain

Back pain due to muscle strain will usually get better on its own, but you can take steps to make yourself more comfortable. A heating pad or warm baths may provide temporary pain relief.

The Bed Rest Debate

When your back hurts, you may not feel like getting out of bed. But if the problem is muscle strain, doctors recommend returning to your normal activities as soon as possible. Studies suggest that any more than a day or two of bed rest can actually make the pain worse and may reduce muscle tone and flexibility.

Yoga

If back pain doesn’t go away in three months, there’s evidence that yoga can help. In one recent study, people who took 12 weeks of yoga classes had fewer symptoms of low back pain than people who were given a book about care for back pain. The benefits lasted several months after the classes were finished. The study suggests conventional stretching also works just as well. Make sure your instructor is experienced at teaching people with back pain and will modify postures for you as needed.

Medications

Mild back pain often feels better with over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen. Pain-relieving creams may be helpful for muscle aches. For severe pain or chronic pain, your doctor may recommend prescription medication.

Injections

If simpler therapies and medications aren’t helping, your doctor may recommend injections to the back. One procedure, called a nerve root block, targets irritated nerves. Injections for back pain usually contain steroid medication.

Surgery

If long-lasting back pain is interfering with your daily life, and other treatments have not provided relief, you may be a candidate for surgery. Depending on the cause of your pain, a surgeon may remove a herniated disc, widen the space around the spinal cord, and/or fuse two spinal vertebrae together.

Physical Therapy

If back pain has left you inactive for a long time, a rehabilitation program can help you strengthen your muscles and get back to your daily activities. A physical therapist can guide you through stretches, strength exercises, and low-impact cardio that will help you be fitter without straining your back.

Strengthening the Back

Two types of strength-training moves that may benefit the lower back are flexion and extension exercises. In flexion exercises, you bend forward to stretch the muscles of the back and hips. In extension exercises, you bend backward to develop the muscles that support the spine. One example is doing leg lifts while lying on your stomach. Depending on the cause of your back pain, there are some exercises you should not do. If you have back pain, make sure to talk to your doctor about what exercises are safe for you.

Preventing Low Back Pain

There’s no sure way to prevent back pain as you age, but there are steps you can take to lower your risk:

  • Stay at a healthy weight.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Lift with your legs, not your back.
  • Make sure your work station position isn’t contributing to your pain.

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