Osteoporosis

This patient’s guide contains important information for:

  • women who are going through menopause or have gone through it
  • elderly men
  • the caregivers or loved ones of the above

The risks of osteoporosis apply to elderly women and men who have:

  • a previous non-violent fracture
  • (for women) early menopause before age 45, whether natural or after surgery
  • an immediate family member who has osteoporosis
  • underweight or undernourished status
  • frailties due to long-term illness
  • smoking habit
  • heavy drinking habit
  • lack of exercise or long term incapacitation
  • a diet lacking enough calcium or vitamin D
  • certain illnesses (eg, rheumatoid arthritis)
  • certain medications (eg, thyroid medication)

Urgent attention to osteoporosis is suggested for those who are already experiencing.

  • Fractures, especially if one or more occur in the spine, wrist, hip, pelvis, or upper arm
  • Reduced height which may be caused by spinal compression fractures
  • Hunching of the back which may occur when the upper back bones are fractured
  • Low back pain as a result of spinal problem

Towards Better Bone Health

OSTEO (BONE) + POROSIS (POROUS) =

POROUS OR BRITTLE BONES

Every year, millions of women and men experience bone loss that can lead to osteoporosis – a condition that weakens the bones, and makes them prone to fractures that can have a devastating effect on daily life. However, osteoporosis does not have to a fact of life. This page tells you when and why it forms, how it can be detected, how many people it affects, what its complications are, and what can be done to treat or prevent osteoporosis. Understanding, detecting, and preventing the effects of osteoporosis can greatly improve an osteoporotic individual’s risk profile, physical independence, and quality of life.

Related Articles:
Understanding Osteoporosis
Detecting Osteoporosis
Preventing Osteoporosis
Treating Osteoporosis

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