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Knee Pain Clinic

Are you frustrated with your knee pain that is not getting better? Are you experiencing Knee discomfort after prolong walking, squatting or running? You are in the right place! We certainly able to help with our innovative and non-invasive (non-surgical) form of treatment. Get your knee check today. Call us at (65) 64712744 or SMS to (65) 92357641 to schedule for an appointment

Knee Pain

Knee pain refers to pain that occurs in and around your knee joint. Knee pain can be caused by problems with the knee joint itself, or it can be caused by conditions affecting the soft tissues, ligaments, tendons, or bursae that surround the knee.

The severity of knee pain can vary widely. Some people may feel only a slight twinge, while others may experience debilitating knee pain that interferes with their day-to-day activities. In most cases, self-care measures can help you cope with knee pain.

The knee consists of two long leg-bones held together by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Many knee problems are a result of the aging process and continual wear and stress on the knee joint. Other knee problems result from injury or a sudden movement that stiffens the knee.

Some common conditions of Knee Problem include:

  • ARTHRITIS – Knee pain is a common problem in Asia, especially in individuals above the age of 40. The most common cause of knee pain is degenerative osteoarthritis. Women are more prone to the disease. It is characterized by mild to debilitating pain.

  • LIGAMENT INJURIES – Ligament injuries in the knee; such as an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are dreaded by professional and amateur athletes alike. They can be painful and debilitating. They can even permanently change your lifestyle.

  • MENISCAL TEAR – The meniscus is a small “c” shaped cartilage that acts as a cushion in the knee joint. They sit between the femur and the tibia bone, one on the outside and one on the inside of the knee.

  • PATELLAR TENDONITIS – Patellar tendinitis is a common overuse injury. It occurs when repeated stress is placed on the patellar tendon. The stress results in tiny tears in the tendon, which the body attempts to repair.

  • CHONDROMALACIA PATELLA – Chondromalacia patella is a common cause of kneecap pain or anterior knee pain. Often called “Runner’s Knee,” this condition often affects young, otherwise healthy athletes.

  • DISLOCATING KNEECAPS – Kneecap dislocation occurs when the triangle-shaped bone covering the knee (patella) moves or slides out of place. The problem usually occurs toward the outside of the leg.

  • BAKER’S CYST – A Baker cyst is swelling caused by fluid from the knee joint protruding to the back of the knee. The back of the knee is also referred to as the popliteal area of the knee

  • BURSITIS – A bursa is a closed fluid-filled sac that functions as a gliding surface to reduce friction between tissues of the body.

  • PLICA SYNDROME – Often called “synovial plica syndrome,” this is a condition that is the result of a remnant of fetal tissue in the knee. The synovial plica are membranes that separate the knee into compartments during fetal development.

  • OSGOOD-SCHALLATER DISEASE – Osgood-Schlatter disease is a disorder of the lower front of the knee where the large tendon under the kneecap (patellar tendon) attaches to the bone of the leg below.

  • OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS – Osteochondritis dissecans is a joint condition in which a piece of cartilage, along with a thin layer of the bone beneath it, comes loose from the end of a bone.

  • GOUT – Gout is a rheumatoid form of arthritis that causes the inflammation, joint pain and swelling especially in the toe, knee and ankle, also reducing their mobility.

  • SHIN SPLINT – Shin splints are a member of a group of injuries called “overuse injuries.” Shin splints occur most commonly in runners or aggressive walkers

When do you need to call us about your knee pain?

If you are unsure of the cause of your symptoms, or if you do not know the specific treatment recommendations for your condition, you should seek medical attention. Treatment of knee pain must be directed at the specific cause of your problem. Some signs that you should be seen by a doctor include:

  • Inability to walk comfortably on the affected side

  • Injury that causes deformity around the joint

  • Knee pain that occurs at night or while resting

  • Knee pain that persists beyond a few days

  • Locking (inability to bend) the knee

  • Swelling of the joint or the calf area

  • Signs of an infection, including fever, redness, warmth

  • Any other unusual symptoms

Treatments for Knee Pain

Treatment of knee pain depends entirely on the cause of the problem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that you understand the cause of your symptoms before embarking on a treatment program. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, or the severity of your condition, you should seek medical advice before beginning any treatment plan.

Read more about patient guide to knee pain

Read more about knee pain while running

Read more about knee pain causing by heavy weight

Read more about 9 tips to avoid knee pain and injuries

Read more about Meniscus Cartilage Tear

Who is Knee Specialist?

Knee specialist is an orthopaedic surgeon specialise in disorders of the knee. They deal with conditions such as knee arthritis, and damage to the knee ligaments. The operations and treatments that knee specialists offer include total and partial knee replacement, arthroscopic knee surgery, and knee ligament reconstruction (including anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction).

CURE YOUR KNEE PAIN TODAY. GET A KNEE SPECIALIST TO RULE OUT THE CAUSES AND CURE OF YOUR KNEE PAIN. CALL US +65 64712744 OR EMAIL INFO@BONECLINIC.COM.SG TO SCHEDULE FOR AN APPOINTMENT

Patient Education about Knee Pain

The knee is one of the largest and most complex joints in the body. The knee joins the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). The smaller bone that runs alongside the tibia (fibula) and the kneecap (patella) are the other bones that make the knee joint.

Tendons connect the knee bones to the leg muscles that move the knee joint. Ligaments join the knee bones and provide stability to the knee:

  • The anterior cruciate ligament prevents the femur from sliding backward on the tibia (or the tibia sliding forward on the femur).
  • The posterior cruciate ligament prevents the femur from sliding forward on the tibia (or the tibia from sliding backward on the femur).
  • The medial and lateral collateral ligaments prevent the femur from sliding side to side.

Two C-shaped pieces of cartilage called the medial and lateral menisci act as shock absorbers between the femur and tibia.
Numerous bursae, or fluid-filled sacs, help the knee move smoothly.

Your knee joints serve a vital role holding up your bodyweight and are put through even more pressure when you walk, run or jump. Knee pain is very common, both from sport injuries and the wear and tear of day-to-day life.

Knee pain can come from injuries including sprains, swollen or torn ligaments (anterior cruciate ligament or ACL), meniscus or cartilage tears and runner’s knee.

Sports injuries tend to affect one knee at a time. Pain in both knees is more common with arthritis, osteoarthritis, gout or pseudogout, usually later in life.

Conditions that cause knee pain

  • Tendonitis. This is an overuse injury causing swelling of the tendons, the bands of tissue that connect your bones and muscles. This is sometimes called ‘jumper’s knee’ as it is common in sports involving jumping, such as basketball.
  • Bone chips. Sometimes, a knee injury can break off fragments from the bone or cartilage. These pieces can get stuck in the joint, causing it to freeze up. You may also have pain and swelling.
  • Housemaid’s knee or bursitis is caused by kneeling for long periods of time or repetitive knee movements. Fluid builds up in the bursa, the sac of fluid that cushions the knee joints. Swelling behind the knee is called a ‘Baker’s cyst’ and may be caused by injuries or arthritis.
  • Bleeding in the knee joint. This injury is also called haemarthrosis and affectsblood vessels around the knee ligaments causing the knee to feel warm, stiff, bruised and swollen. This may require hospital treatment in serious cases.
  • Iliotibial band syndrome. This is an overuse injury to the iliotibial band of tissue that runs from the hip to the shin past the knee.
  • Medial plica syndrome. This overuse injury affects the plica, a fold of tissue in the knee joint.
  • Osgood- Schlatter Disease. This overuse condition is common in teenagers playing sport and causes swelling and tenderness over the bony bump just below the knee.
  • Partially dislocated kneecap (or patellar subluxation). This is usually due to a physical condition with the legs rather than a sports injury. The kneecap slides out of position and causes pain and swelling.

Treatment for knee pain

Treatment will depend on the type and severity of the injury. Many knee injuries will get better on their own, or can be treated at home. Avoid putting weight on the injured knee as much as possible. Raise the leg with cushions and use an ice pack or bag of frozen veg wrapped in a towel held to the knee. Painkillers such asibuprofen can help with pain and swelling.

You may need to see your GP or seek medical advice if:

  • No weight can be put on the injured knee
  • There’s severe pain when no weight is put on the knee
  • The knee locks, clicks painfully or gives way
  • The knee looks deformed
  • There’s fever, redness or a feeling of heat around the knee, or there’s extensive swelling
  • The calf beneath the injured knee is painful, swollen, numb or tingling
  • Pain is still there after three days of home care treatment

A doctor will carry out a physical examination of the injured knee and may arrange some extra tests, including blood tests, an X-ray or MRI scan.

Treatment may involve physiotherapy, painkillers and sometimes an arthroscopy – a form of keyhole surgery that is used to look inside a joint and repair any damage that has occurred.

When will my knee pain feel better?

Recovery from knee pain will depend on the type and severity of the injury.

If recovery prevents you doing high impact sport such as running, try a low impact one like swimming.

Preventing knee pain

Knee pain cannot always be avoided, but good precautions include stretching, warming up and cooling down around a workout or playing sport. Having the right equipment, such as trainers designed for running and kneepads for jobs involving kneeling can help.

Stop exercising if you feel pain in your knee.

GET KNEE CHECK AND BE PAIN FREE TODAY! CALL US FOR APPOINTMENT +65 6471 2744 OR EMAIL TO: info@boneclinic.com.sg

Should my child have ACL Surgery?

ACL injury in child

ACL Tears in Children

ACL reconstruction surgery is the standard treatment for young, active people who sustain an ACL tear. But what happens when that person is a child? Should ACL surgery be delayed until the child is older, or should ACL reconstruction be performed before skeletal maturity?

Answer: Traditionally, when a child injured his anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a connection within the knee important for joint stability, surgeons were reluctant to operate and reconstruct the ligament right away for fear of damaging the growth plate. The concern was that before a child has reached skeletal maturity (about 12-13 years old in girls or 14-15 years old in boys) this type of surgery presented a risk of injuring the growth plate. Growth plate problems resulting from ACL surgery could lead to unequal leg lengths or angular deformity. However, recent research shows that the risk of growth plate problems is much less then the risk of permanent knee damage if the ACL is not fixed.

Growth Plates in Children

The growth plates are the part of the bone that grows in length. Most bone growth occurs near to the ends of long bones in these areas called growth plates. Two of the most active growth plates in the body are just above and just below the knee joint. These growth plates contribute to the length of both the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia).Traditional ACL reconstructive surgery involves making a tunnel in the bone directly in the location of these growth plates. At the time of skeletal maturity, the growth plate closes. Once the growth plate is closed (or nearly closed) the risk of causing a growth disturbance is gone. However, by drilling a hole through an open growth plate, the body may close the growth plate early. This could lead to complete growth plate closure, causing leg length inequality, or partial growth plate closure, causing angular deformity. Angular deformity could in turn lead to knock knees (genu valgus) and bow legs (genu varus), These conditions progressively worsen with further growth and could lead to problems such as joint damage and arthritis.

ACL Tears in Children

Knees that are unstable as a result of ACL tears have a high chance of meniscus tears and cartilage injury. Many surgeons have recommended that ACL surgery in children be delayed until the child has reached skeletal maturity. The hope being that by delaying surgery, you could avoid the potential complications of growth plate injury as a result of ACL surgery.Two factors have lead to more surgeons recommending early ACL surgery, even in children. First, more recent research has evaluated the risk of growth plate injury in comparison to the downside of delaying surgical treatment of the torn ACL. The risk of meniscus tears and cartilage injury was found in a recent study to be higher than the risk of growth disturbances. Second, there are modifications to traditional ACL surgery that allow the growth plate to be minimally affected in children. Furthermore, your doctor may recommend a specific type of graft to help minimize the chance of growth plate injury if surgical treatment is pursued. Therefore, more surgeons are recommending early ACL surgery, even in children.

The bottom line is that the risks of waiting (joint instability, meniscus tears, and cartilage injury) appear to be greater than the risk of growth plate injury for early ACL reconstruction with current surgical approaches. As a result surgeons today are more likely to recommend early ACL reconstruction.

Back to Sports: Advance Knee Rehabilitation

Knee injury is one of the most common injuries sustained in sports. It can be in the form of meniscal or ligamentous  injury, the most notorious being the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tear. As a result of such injuries, athletes of ten get frustrated as they are unable to perform as their best or even engage in the sport itself. More often than not, athletes do not manage their injuries well and many will attempt to return to sports much earlier than optimal and usually end up worse than before.

Bringing a competitive athlete from injury back to sports requires much more planning than just restoring range of motion and strength. It requires a good understanding of the healing processes, in depth knowledge of strength and conditioning as well as biomechanics of the body in relation to each sport, and the most important of all, the abiloty to implement the rehabilitation process systematically and appropriatelly. It is a science all to itself.

There are three phases in the rehabilitation process; healing and restoration phase, sports conditioning phase. Healing and restoration phase usually takes about four to six weeks and aims to get the athlete back to full range of motion and normal gait. Strength and conditioning phase takes another six to eight weeks with the aim of helping the athlete regain about 80% strength, and at the same time progressively improve their cardiovascular endurance. Finally, the sports conditioning phase aims to improve agility, balance, power and coordination. The phases are not distinct but overlap. With a thorough rehabilitation process, the athlete would be able to return to his sports with a firm foundation in all the key components of physical fitness, allowing him to ease into his sports training with confidence.

Healing and restoration phase (Week 0-4); Aims:

  • Reduce swelling and effusion to minimum
  • Restore normal gait pattern
  • The management of a knee immediately post-operatively focuses on the reduction of swelling and effusion and restoration of range of movement. Exercise such as isometric knee extension is introduced as well to reduce the rate of muscle control.

Strength and Conditioning phase (Week 4-12); Aims:

  • Full range of motion and minimal swelling
  • Unilateral knee exercises
  • Achieving 80% muscle strength of the non injured knee

Once the swelling has reduced significantly, full extension restored with flexion achieved to about 100-120 degrees, and normal gait almost regained, the athlete is then put through other strengthening exercises which can including cycling, leg press, step downs, mini squats (0-45 degrees flexion). All these exercises should be done with both legs, with emphasis on smoothness of execution of movement. The athletes are loaded with low weights at first and then progressed gradually to higher weights with low repetitions. Cardiovascular endurance exercises are also started at this place.

Unilateral knee exercises can be started once the athlete has sufficient muscle control to do a single knee squat of 0-45 degrees flexion. Once the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of the operated knee can achieve about 80% strength of the uninvolved knee, it is time to move on the next phase. The strength of the uninvolved knee, it is time to move on to the next phase. The strength of the knee can be easily gauged by testing the knee on a leg press machine, comparing the weights that be achieved by each knee on a single set of 15 repetitions. A much more accurate test of the strength of the muscles can be done using the isokinetic machine.

The isokinetic strength test is widely used in sports clinics to evaluate the strength of muscles pre and post operatively. However the main drawbacks of the test are that the data does not accurately determine the different performance between athletes of varying skill levels and do not correlate strongly with functional tasks.

Sports Conditioning Phase (Week 12 onwards); Aims:

  • Achieve 90-100% muscle strength in quadriceps and hamstrings
  • Achieve 90-100% in functional testing
  • Athlete is able to perform sports specific movements with ease

Once the athlete can achieve 80% of quadriceps muscle strength and good control over single leg exercise, the next step will be to do functional tests to gauge the performance of the knee. Functional tests have been devised for athletes who has ACL reconstruction done. The tests include jumps, hops, agility and quickness in navigating turns. Various components of physical fitness listed above are tested i.e agility, balance, power and co-ordination. As such, the tests are also suitable to be applied to chart the progress of athletes recovering from post-operative meniscal repair, menisectomy and other ligamentous injury. Being functional, the tests would also be more meaningful as they mimic the movements that would be performed during the sport itself. At this phase, the athletes will be continuing to increase the basic muscle strength through the similar exercises listed in phase 2. These strengthening exercises will form the foundation from which the athletes will be trained in the other components.

Balance is a state of equilibrium, the ability to control the body’s position at rest or in motion. The athlete starts his balance training through balancing on 1 leg on a flat surface before progressing to balancing on unstable surface such as a wobble board. Subsequently, single leg hopping exercises will be introduced and progressed to multi-directional movements, where the level of difficulty is increased.

STOP YOUR KNEE PAIN TODAY. CALL +65 6471 2744 or Email to info@boneclinic.com.sg for appointment

Cycling Knee Problems

Cycling is a great low-impact aerobic activity. Cyclists are usually more efficient on both hills and flat terrain when they pedal quickly (at about 80-85 rpm) rather than at slower cadences. Although cycling is considered a knee-sparing exercise because it does not require impact with the ground, the repetitive motion of pedalling can lead to a variety of overuse knee injuries. The majority of cycling injuries are indeed caused by overuse, which leads to cumulative tissue microtrauma and consequent symptoms. In overuse injuries the problem is often not acute tissue inflammation, but chronic degeneration.

Cycling is obviously very repetitive: during one hour of cycling a rider may average up to 5000 pedal revolutions. But which cyclists sustain overuse knee injuries? Basically, cyclists of every ability level are at risk: riding too hard, too soon and too far is the usual recipe for numerous knee problems. Touring cyclists often develop a knee overuse injury during or after one specific usually long ride. These sporadic high-mileage riders often do not train adequately. Patellar pain is the most frequent problem (for more information see our Patellofemoral problems page), followed by Iliotibial Band Syndrome. Bicycle maladjustments are also frequent in this group and amongst recreational cyclists.

Cyclists vs. Runners

Cycling and Running are two very popular sports, but compared to cycling, running seems to be a better way do build up leg bone density, while cycling regularly will improve on upper limb bone density. Runners have a bit less developed arm muscles. Apart from that, it seems that cycling and running have similar effects on body composition: participants in both have approximately 10% more leg muscle than the exercise abstainers.

Knee Pain

The knee is the most common site of overuse injury in the cyclist, with an estimated 40% to 60% of riders experiencing knee pain. Like other cyclists, mountain bikers can suffer overuse injuries. Such injuries have been studied little in mountain bikers. In one study involving 265 off-road cyclists, 30% had recently experienced knee pain associated with mountain biking, and 37% reported low-back pain while riding; wrist pain and hand numbness were each reported by 19% (4).

Overuse injuries: in chronic cases, continued activity produces degenerative changes that lead to weakness, loss of flexibility, and chronic pain. Thus, in overuse injuries, the problem is often not acute tissue inflammation, but chronic degeneration (hence, for example, patella tendinosis instead of tendinitis). Pain in overuse injuries typically has insidious onset, but it may have an acute-on-chronic presentation. Overuse injuries most likely occur when an athlete changes the mode, intensity, or duration of training.

When evaluating knee pain it is very important to consider cyclists and bicycle anatomy, seasonal variations (early cycling season), training distance and intensity, and numerous human anatomical factors such as inflexibility, muscle imbalance, patellofemoral malalignment, leg-length discrepancy, etc. Do check the leg length: if the difference is up to 10 mm you can correct it by putting spacers under one cleat. If one leg is shorter by more than 10 mm you should try a shorter crank arm on the short leg side. Generally using shorter cranks keeps pedal speed up and knee stress down. Too long crank arms increase forces on the entire knee, but patellar and quadriceps tendons are most affected.

Get your knee checked today. Call +65 6471 2744 or Email to info@boneclinic.com.sg for Appointment

About Knee Pain Overview

If you are suffering from knee pain, see a doctor / orthopedic surgeon who can determine the cause and prescribe an appropriate treatment and pain management plan.

This site covers only the more common types of knee pain. It will familiarize you with various causes, treatments, and prevention of knee pain, but please do not attempt to diagnose yourself.

The knees are the most easily injured part of the body. The largest and most complicated joint, the knee is used for everything from standing up, sitting, to walking, running, etc. It’s a weight-bearing joint that straightens, bends, twists and rotates. All this motion increases your risk of acute or overuse knee injuries.

Acute knee injuries (including torn ligaments and torn cartilage) are often caused by twisting the knee or falling. Sports that involve running and jumping and sudden stopping and turning, such as soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, and baseball, as well as contact sports such as football, wrestling, and hockey increase the risk of an acute knee injury.

But more common than sudden knee injuries are injuries caused by overuse

Overuse knee injuries (including muscle strain, tendonitis and bursitis) may develop gradually over days or weeks. Pain is often mild and intermittent in the beginning and worsens over time. When muscles and tendons are stressed even slightly beyond their capabilities, microscopic tears occur. (Inflammation, which is part of the healing process, is what causes the pain). These tears must be given a chance to heal before subjected to the same activity to avoid overuse injury. Treat overuse injuries early to prevent chronic problems.

Knee pain is commonly caused by doing too much too soon when you haven’t exercised for a long period of time – especially high-impact aerobics; walking, running or jumping on hard surfaces or uneven ground; excessive running up and down stairs (When you walk upstairs you are putting pressure on your knees that is equivalent to four times your body weight, when running up the stairs it can be eight times your body weight).

Knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of knee pain. The risk increases with age. Osteoarthritis is a form of arthritis involving degeneration of the cartilage. Exercise is vital to maintain strength and flexibility of muscles supporting the knee, which reduces the stress on the knee joint.

People with knee osteoarthritis may also need to take pain medications and/or other complementary pain treatments.

Runners knee (also called patellofemoral pain or anterior knee pain) is a common cause of knee pain in young people (not just in runners). The pain is usually diffuse pain behind the kneecap. Symptoms often worsen after climbing stairs, jumping, running, or after a period of sitting. Caused by poor tracking of the kneecap, appropriate exercises prescribed by a doctor or physical therapist is the main treatment in correcting runners knee. Stay away from high-impact activity if you have this condition.

Prevent knee pain by keeping the muscles that support your knees strong and flexible. Start out slowly. Walk before you run – before you engage in a strenuous high impact activity such as jogging or running, try walking for a week. If walking causes knee pain, you shouldn’t be running. Warm up before working out. Give your body a chance to recover from exercise. If you do high impact activities take every other day off. Avoid running up and down stairs and full squats. Doing knee exercises to strengthen and stretch the muscles that support the knee are vital for knee pain and injury prevention. Proper footwear is also important, especially if walking or running on hard surfaces. Keep your weight under control. Reducing one’s weight reduces stress upon the knee.

Most knee pain is treated conservatively, but there are situations in which surgery is required. Athletes are at an elevated risk for sudden injuries that may require surgery, such as torn ligaments in the center of the knee or certain types of fractures. People with advanced knee osteoarthritis may need knee replacement surgery if they are severely limited in day-to- day activities because of their condition. This is optional surgery and is a last resort.

Most knee conditions respond to a combination of non-invasive treatments such as applying heat or cold, temporarily restraining from activities that aggravate pain, and medications that target pain and inflammation. Exercises to strengthen the muscles that support the knee help reduce stress on the knee joint and prevent re-injury.

Get the right Diagnosis and Stop your knee pain today! Call +65 6471 2744 (24 Hours) / Email: info@boneclinic.com.sg