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Knee Pain Clinic

Are you frustrated with your knee pain that is not getting better? Are you experiencing Knee discomfort after prolong walking, squatting or running? You are in the right place! We certainly able to help with our innovative and non-invasive (non-surgical) form of treatment. Get your knee check today. Call us at (65) 64712744 or SMS to (65) 92357641 to schedule for an appointment

Knee Pain

Knee pain refers to pain that occurs in and around your knee joint. Knee pain can be caused by problems with the knee joint itself, or it can be caused by conditions affecting the soft tissues, ligaments, tendons, or bursae that surround the knee.

The severity of knee pain can vary widely. Some people may feel only a slight twinge, while others may experience debilitating knee pain that interferes with their day-to-day activities. In most cases, self-care measures can help you cope with knee pain.

The knee consists of two long leg-bones held together by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Many knee problems are a result of the aging process and continual wear and stress on the knee joint. Other knee problems result from injury or a sudden movement that stiffens the knee.

Some common conditions of Knee Problem include:

  • ARTHRITIS – Knee pain is a common problem in Asia, especially in individuals above the age of 40. The most common cause of knee pain is degenerative osteoarthritis. Women are more prone to the disease. It is characterized by mild to debilitating pain.

  • LIGAMENT INJURIES – Ligament injuries in the knee; such as an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are dreaded by professional and amateur athletes alike. They can be painful and debilitating. They can even permanently change your lifestyle.

  • MENISCAL TEAR – The meniscus is a small “c” shaped cartilage that acts as a cushion in the knee joint. They sit between the femur and the tibia bone, one on the outside and one on the inside of the knee.

  • PATELLAR TENDONITIS – Patellar tendinitis is a common overuse injury. It occurs when repeated stress is placed on the patellar tendon. The stress results in tiny tears in the tendon, which the body attempts to repair.

  • CHONDROMALACIA PATELLA – Chondromalacia patella is a common cause of kneecap pain or anterior knee pain. Often called “Runner’s Knee,” this condition often affects young, otherwise healthy athletes.

  • DISLOCATING KNEECAPS – Kneecap dislocation occurs when the triangle-shaped bone covering the knee (patella) moves or slides out of place. The problem usually occurs toward the outside of the leg.

  • BAKER’S CYST – A Baker cyst is swelling caused by fluid from the knee joint protruding to the back of the knee. The back of the knee is also referred to as the popliteal area of the knee

  • BURSITIS – A bursa is a closed fluid-filled sac that functions as a gliding surface to reduce friction between tissues of the body.

  • PLICA SYNDROME – Often called “synovial plica syndrome,” this is a condition that is the result of a remnant of fetal tissue in the knee. The synovial plica are membranes that separate the knee into compartments during fetal development.

  • OSGOOD-SCHALLATER DISEASE – Osgood-Schlatter disease is a disorder of the lower front of the knee where the large tendon under the kneecap (patellar tendon) attaches to the bone of the leg below.

  • OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS – Osteochondritis dissecans is a joint condition in which a piece of cartilage, along with a thin layer of the bone beneath it, comes loose from the end of a bone.

  • GOUT – Gout is a rheumatoid form of arthritis that causes the inflammation, joint pain and swelling especially in the toe, knee and ankle, also reducing their mobility.

  • SHIN SPLINT – Shin splints are a member of a group of injuries called “overuse injuries.” Shin splints occur most commonly in runners or aggressive walkers

When do you need to call us about your knee pain?

If you are unsure of the cause of your symptoms, or if you do not know the specific treatment recommendations for your condition, you should seek medical attention. Treatment of knee pain must be directed at the specific cause of your problem. Some signs that you should be seen by a doctor include:

  • Inability to walk comfortably on the affected side

  • Injury that causes deformity around the joint

  • Knee pain that occurs at night or while resting

  • Knee pain that persists beyond a few days

  • Locking (inability to bend) the knee

  • Swelling of the joint or the calf area

  • Signs of an infection, including fever, redness, warmth

  • Any other unusual symptoms

Treatments for Knee Pain

Treatment of knee pain depends entirely on the cause of the problem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that you understand the cause of your symptoms before embarking on a treatment program. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, or the severity of your condition, you should seek medical advice before beginning any treatment plan.

Read more about patient guide to knee pain

Read more about knee pain while running

Read more about knee pain causing by heavy weight

Read more about 9 tips to avoid knee pain and injuries

Read more about Meniscus Cartilage Tear

Who is Knee Specialist?

Knee specialist is an orthopaedic surgeon specialise in disorders of the knee. They deal with conditions such as knee arthritis, and damage to the knee ligaments. The operations and treatments that knee specialists offer include total and partial knee replacement, arthroscopic knee surgery, and knee ligament reconstruction (including anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction).

CURE YOUR KNEE PAIN TODAY. GET A KNEE SPECIALIST TO RULE OUT THE CAUSES AND CURE OF YOUR KNEE PAIN. CALL US +65 64712744 OR EMAIL INFO@BONECLINIC.COM.SG TO SCHEDULE FOR AN APPOINTMENT

Osteoarthritis (Knee Pain Clinic)

Are you looking for effective way to manage and cure Osteoarthritis? You are at the right place. Stop your Knee Pain today! Call us at +65 6471 2744 or SMS to +65 92357641 to schedule for an appointment.

The most common form of arthritis, Osteoarthritis (OA) affects an estimated 40% of the adult population. Of these, only 10% seek medical advice and only 1% are severely disabled.

Knee Osteoarthritis

Knee Osteoarthritis

Causes

Osteoarthritis (OA) means inflammation of the joints although it is better known as a degenerative disease due to the inflammation of the joints with thinning of the articular cartilage. The cartilage in our joints allows for the smooth movement of joints. When it becomes damaged due to injury, infection or gradual effects of ageing, joints movement is hindered. As a result, the tissues within the joint become irritated causing pain and swelling within the joint.

Symptoms

In OA, you will have no problem in the morning on arising but as the day progresses your discomfort will increase.

In the evening, there will be a dull ache in the area of the affected joint.

Other symptoms include:

  • Pain
  • Swelling of the affected joints
  • Changes in surrounding joints
  • Warmth – The arthritic joint may feel warm to the touch
  • Crepitation – A sensation of grating or grinding in the affected joint caused by the rubbing of damaged cartilage surfaces
  • Cysts – In OA of the hand, small cysts may develop, which may cause the ridging or dents in the nail plate of the affected finger

The changes associated with degenerative arthritis tend to involve similar joints. Whereas in post-traumatic degenerative arthritis where there is a history of acute or chronic trauma, the changes tend to be isolated to the specific joints injured.

Risk Factors

Old age
As a person grows older, it becomes more likely that the cartilage may be worn away. OA is uncommon in people below 40 years of age.

Gender
Women are more likely to suffer from OA, especially after menopause.

Previous joint injury
Someone with a previous injury to the cartilage within the joint, e.g. after a fracture involving the joint or after a sporting injury to the joint will have a higher risk of developing OA later in life.

Weight
A greater than normal body weight puts more stress on the weight-bearing joints such as the hip and knee, increasing the likelihood of developing OA in these joints.

Bone deformities
People born with deformed joints or abnormal cartilage have an increased risk of OA.

Other diseases that affect the joints
Bone and joint diseases that increase the risk of OA include other arthritic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and gout.

Genetics
Genetic factors may predispose to the development of OA.

Diagnosis

The specialist will begin by taking a detailed history of your problem and past medical problems, followed by a physical examination. He may then proceed to other tests, such as:

X-rays
This is the most commonly performed test to evaluate the status of the affected joint and the alignment of the joint. Normal x-rays are safe, simple and pain-free.

Blood tests
Depending on the clinical findings, blood may be drawn for special testing, to rule out other causes of joint pain, e.g. due to rheumatoid arthritis, gout or infection.

Joint aspiration
Occasionally, especially when the joint is very swollen, the doctor may choose to suck some fluid out of the swollen joint for special testing. Removal of joint fluid also sometimes relieves pain.

Treatment Options

The goals for treatment for osteoarthritis are:

i. Pain relief
ii. Maintenance of function
iii. Prevention of associated deformities
iv. Patient education

The treatment for OA depends on the severity of the disease and the patient’s own lifestyle expectations.

Early cases of OA can generally be treated with:

  • Rest and lifestyle modification, such as weight loss and cessation of smoking
  • Use of aid (e.g. a walking stick). Use of good shoes is also helpful for relieving symptoms in some
    cases of OA
  • Exercise and physiotherapy to strengthen muscles and improve joint flexibility
  • Medication

In OA of the hand, rest can be accomplished by selectively immobilising the joint in a splint. Splinting is initially done for a period of 3 – 4 weeks, during which the splint is worn continuously.

This is usually combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (NSAIDs) taken at the same time. If there is improvement in symptoms, use of the splint during the day is progressively diminished over the course of the coming month/s.

Use of NSAIDS
Gastrointestinal intolerance remains one of the major factors limiting the prolonged use of NSAIDs and may require temporary or permanent discontinuation of the anti-inflammatory agent. Concomitant use of H2 blockers, omeprazole, or misoprostol, a prostaglandin analogue that counteracts the mucosal effects of NSAIDs, may mitigate some of the gastrointestinal effects. Nephrotoxicity is a well-known complication of NSAIDs, and patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency should not take NSAIDs for extended periods.

Types of medication
There is presently no medication that can cure OA or regrow the cartilage in osteoarthritic joints.

The most commonly prescribed medications are painkillers. The type of painkiller prescribed depends on
the severity of the pain. For early disease with mild and occasional pain, simple painkillers, although more severe pain may require the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID’s) for relief. Analgesic (painkillers) creams and adhesive patches can also be used.

Glucosamine, with or without chondroitin, has also become a popular drug treatment in recent
years. It can be purchased without a doctor’s prescription.

However, it is ineffective in many patients, especially those with severe OA. The duration of its symptomatic relief also tends to be temporary. There is no evidence that glucosamine or chondroitin is able to result in cartilage repair.

Injections
For the treatment of OA, your doctor may sometimes recommend a lubricant injection to coat the cartilage and stimulate the healing process.

Surgery
Surgery is usually only offered for severe disease that has not responded to conservative treatments mentioned. Both the type of surgery and the decision for surgery are made following careful discussions between you and your doctor.

For many joints in the hands, arthodesis or fusion of the joint is the method of choice. In joint fusion, the arthritic surface is removed and bones on either side of the joint are fused to eliminate movement from the problem joint.

There may be some loss of movement but the pain ablation and stability may functionally improve the joint that is severely affected by the degenerative joint disease.

STOP YOUR KNEE PAIN TODAY. CALL US AT +65 6471 2744 Or SMS TO +65 92357641 FOR APPOINTMENT

Knee Ostearthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the Knee is one the most common knee joint disorder, which is due to aging and wear and tear on the knee joint.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Osteoarthritis of the knee is a normal result of aging. It is also caused by constant ‘wear and tear’ on the knee joint.

  • Cartilage is the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions your bones at the joints, and allows bones to glide over one another.
  • If the cartilage breaks down and wears away, the bones rub together. This causes pain, swelling, and stiffness around your knee.
  • Bony spurs or extra bone may form around the knee joint. The ligaments and muscles around the knee joint become weaker and stiffer which cause discomfort.

Often, the cause of Osteoarthritis of the knee is unknown. It is mainly related to aging.

The symptoms of Osteoarthritis of the knee usually appear in middle age. Almost everyone has some symptoms by age 70. However, these symptoms may be minor.

Before age 55, Osteoarthritis of the knee occurs equally in men and women. After age 55, it is more common in women.

Other factors can also lead to Osteoarthritis of the knee

  • Osteoarthritis of the knee tends to run in families.
  • Being overweight increases the risk of Osteoarthritis of the knee joints because extra weight causes more wear and tear.
  • Fractures or other joint injuries can lead to OA later in life. This includes injuries to the cartilage and cruciate ligaments in your knee joints.
  • Jobs that involve kneeling or squatting for more than an hour a day put you at the highest risk. Jobs that involve lifting, climbing stairs, or walking also put you at risk.
  • Playing sports that involve direct impact on the joint (such as football), twisting (such as basketball or soccer), or throwing also increase the risk of arthritis.

Medical conditions that can lead to Osteoarthritis of the knee include:

  • Bleeding disorders that cause bleeding in the joint, such as hemophilia
  • Disorders that block the blood supply near a joint and lead to avascular necrosis
  • Other types of arthritis, such as chronic gout, pseudogout, or rheumatoid arthritis

Symptoms

Pain and stiffness in the knee joints are the most common symptoms. The pain is often worse after exercise and when you put weight or pressure on the joint.

If you have Osteoarthritis of the knee, your knee joints probably become stiffer and harder to move over time. You may notice a rubbing, grating, or crackling sound when you move the knee joint.

The phrase “morning stiffness” refers to the pain and stiffness you may feel when you first wake up in the morning. Stiffness usually lasts for 30 minutes or less. It is improved by mild activity that “warms up” the joint.

During the day, the pain may get worse when you’re active and feel better when you are resting. After a while, the pain may be present when you are resting. It may even wake you up at night.

Some people might not have symptoms, even though x-rays show the changes of Osteoarthritis of the knee.

Signs and tests

A physical exam can show:

  • Joint movement may cause a cracking (grating) sound, called crepitation
  • Joint swelling (bones around the joints may feel larger than normal)
  • Limited range of motion
  • Tenderness when the joint is pressed
  • Normal movement is often painful

No blood tests are helpful in diagnosing Osteoarthritis of the knee.

An x-ray of affected joints will show a loss of the joint space. In advanced cases, there will be a wearing down of the ends of the bone and bone spurs.

Treatment

Osteoarthritis of the knee will most likely get worse over time. However, your Osteoarthritis of the knee symptoms can be controlled.

You can have surgery, but other treatments can improve your pain and make your life much better. Although these treatments cannot make the arthritis go away, they can often delay surgery.

MEDICATIONS

Over-the-counter pain relievers, which you can buy without a prescription, can help with Osteoarthritis of the knee symptoms. Most doctors recommend acetaminophen (Tylenol) first, because it has fewer side effects than other drugs. If your pain continues, your doctor may recommend nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Types of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen.

Other medications or supplements that you may use include:

  • Corticosteroids injected right into the joint to reduce swelling and pain
  • Over-the-counter remedies such as glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate
  • Capsaicin (Zostrix) skin cream to relieve pain
  • Artificial joint fluid (Synvisc, Hyalgan) can be injected into the knee to relieve pain for 3 – 6 months

LIFESTYLE CHANGES

Staying active and getting exercise helps maintain joint and overall movement. Ask your health care provider to recommend an appropriate home exercise routine. Water exercises, such as swimming, are especially helpful.

Other lifestyle recommendations include:

  • Applying heat and cold
  • Eating a healthy, balanced diet
  • Getting rest
  • Losing weight if you are overweight
  • Protecting the joints

As the pain from your Osteoarthritis of the knee becomes worse, keeping up with everyday activities may become more difficult or painful.

  • Sometimes making changes around the home will take some stress off your joints, and relieve some of the pain.
  • If your work is causing stress in certain joints, you may need to adjust your work area or change work tasks.

SURGERY

Severe cases of Osteoarthritis of the knee might need surgery to replace or repair damaged joints. Surgical options include:

  • Arthroscopic surgery to trim torn and damaged cartilage
  • Changing the alignment of a bone to relieve stress on the bone or joint (osteotomy)
  • Surgical fusion of bones, usually in the spine (arthrodesis)
  • Total or partial replacement of the damaged joint with an artificial joint (knee replacement, hip replacement, shoulder replacement, ankle replacement, elbow replacement)

Expectations (prognosis)

Every person with Osteoarthritis of the knee is different. Pain and stiffness may prevent one person from performing simple daily activities, while others are able to maintain an active lifestyle that includes sports and other activities.

Your movement may become very limited over time. Doing everyday activities, such as personal hygiene, household chores, or cooking may become a challenge. Treatment usually improves function.

STOP YOUR KNEE PAIN TODAY. CALL +65 6471 2744 or SMS to +65 92357641 for Appointment.

About Knee Pain Overview

If you are suffering from knee pain, see a doctor / orthopedic surgeon who can determine the cause and prescribe an appropriate treatment and pain management plan.

This site covers only the more common types of knee pain. It will familiarize you with various causes, treatments, and prevention of knee pain, but please do not attempt to diagnose yourself.

The knees are the most easily injured part of the body. The largest and most complicated joint, the knee is used for everything from standing up, sitting, to walking, running, etc. It’s a weight-bearing joint that straightens, bends, twists and rotates. All this motion increases your risk of acute or overuse knee injuries.

Acute knee injuries (including torn ligaments and torn cartilage) are often caused by twisting the knee or falling. Sports that involve running and jumping and sudden stopping and turning, such as soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, and baseball, as well as contact sports such as football, wrestling, and hockey increase the risk of an acute knee injury.

But more common than sudden knee injuries are injuries caused by overuse

Overuse knee injuries (including muscle strain, tendonitis and bursitis) may develop gradually over days or weeks. Pain is often mild and intermittent in the beginning and worsens over time. When muscles and tendons are stressed even slightly beyond their capabilities, microscopic tears occur. (Inflammation, which is part of the healing process, is what causes the pain). These tears must be given a chance to heal before subjected to the same activity to avoid overuse injury. Treat overuse injuries early to prevent chronic problems.

Knee pain is commonly caused by doing too much too soon when you haven’t exercised for a long period of time – especially high-impact aerobics; walking, running or jumping on hard surfaces or uneven ground; excessive running up and down stairs (When you walk upstairs you are putting pressure on your knees that is equivalent to four times your body weight, when running up the stairs it can be eight times your body weight).

Knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of knee pain. The risk increases with age. Osteoarthritis is a form of arthritis involving degeneration of the cartilage. Exercise is vital to maintain strength and flexibility of muscles supporting the knee, which reduces the stress on the knee joint.

People with knee osteoarthritis may also need to take pain medications and/or other complementary pain treatments.

Runners knee (also called patellofemoral pain or anterior knee pain) is a common cause of knee pain in young people (not just in runners). The pain is usually diffuse pain behind the kneecap. Symptoms often worsen after climbing stairs, jumping, running, or after a period of sitting. Caused by poor tracking of the kneecap, appropriate exercises prescribed by a doctor or physical therapist is the main treatment in correcting runners knee. Stay away from high-impact activity if you have this condition.

Prevent knee pain by keeping the muscles that support your knees strong and flexible. Start out slowly. Walk before you run – before you engage in a strenuous high impact activity such as jogging or running, try walking for a week. If walking causes knee pain, you shouldn’t be running. Warm up before working out. Give your body a chance to recover from exercise. If you do high impact activities take every other day off. Avoid running up and down stairs and full squats. Doing knee exercises to strengthen and stretch the muscles that support the knee are vital for knee pain and injury prevention. Proper footwear is also important, especially if walking or running on hard surfaces. Keep your weight under control. Reducing one’s weight reduces stress upon the knee.

Most knee pain is treated conservatively, but there are situations in which surgery is required. Athletes are at an elevated risk for sudden injuries that may require surgery, such as torn ligaments in the center of the knee or certain types of fractures. People with advanced knee osteoarthritis may need knee replacement surgery if they are severely limited in day-to- day activities because of their condition. This is optional surgery and is a last resort.

Most knee conditions respond to a combination of non-invasive treatments such as applying heat or cold, temporarily restraining from activities that aggravate pain, and medications that target pain and inflammation. Exercises to strengthen the muscles that support the knee help reduce stress on the knee joint and prevent re-injury.

Get the right Diagnosis and Stop your knee pain today! Call +65 6471 2744 (24 Hours) / Email: info@boneclinic.com.sg

Knee Pain While Running

Knee pain while running can quickly turn an enjoyable workout into a painful chore. Knee pain is one of the most common injury complaints of runners, and can derail training programs for weeks and sometimes even months. But not all knee pains are the same, as there are multiple causes, symptoms, and treatments that go with each of these. Check out the injuries below to see which type of knee injury may pertain to you; what you can do to avoid it; and how best to treat it. As with any injury, consult a medical professional for treatment and advice as they can better ascertain your exact injury and the best treatment alternative.

Knee Pain While Running

The knee is one of the most complex joints in our body. It’s the juncture where four bones come together (femur, tibia, fibula, and patella. It’s supported by a cast of tendons, ligaments, and cartilage, and it is the location where out Iliotibial Band (“IT band”) connects our lower leg to our pelvis at a point just below the knee. So suffice to say that knee injuries from running could come from a variety of sources. Here are just a few causes of knee pain for runners:

Runner’s Knee is the more popular term that refers to Chondromalacia of the knee cap (patella). This can be caused when there’s an imbalance of the muscles or overpronation. Symptoms include a pain around the knee, and frequent “pop” or “crack” noises as the knee cap seems to be almost off track. This also may be accompanied by swelling and inflammation around the knee cap as the cartilage becomes soft, and irritated, leading to potential deterioration.

Some ways to counteract this condition are strength training exercise that build the hamstring, quadriceps, thigh and calve muscles. If overpronation is deemed a possible cause, then orthotics or shoes that promote better running mechanics may help alleviate this injury.

Knee Pain While Running – Patella Tendonitis

The knee cap (patella) connects to our lower leg by the patellar tendon. Overuse and stress of this tendon can lead to inflammation and eventually tendonitis. This injury will cause pain and stiffness below the knee cap and may exhibit some mild swelling. I had this injury during my senior year of high school cross country, and thankfully was able to treat this with a few weeks of rest and leg strengthening exercises. As with most injuries, the R.I.C.E. acronym is a good precautionary first measure: Rest-Ice-Compression-Elevation. No one likes to take days off especially runner, but rest is usually part of almost all successful treatment solutions.

Knee Pain While Running – Meniscus Degradation

Our knee joints have crescent-shaped cartilage shock absorbers for our knee cap that form our meniscus. This cushion can become torn from excessive wear or twisting movements of the knee. Minor strains and tears will likely be prescribed the R.I.C.E. treatment, while more serious injuries may require arthroscopic surgery. Pay attention to warning signs…and when in doubt…take a rest day and consult a sports medicine physician if the knee pain while running is severe.

Knee Pain While Running – Iliotibial Band Syndrome

If your knee pain while running is on the outside of your knee, you may be suffering from IT band syndrome. This can occur when the IT band, which stretches from our pelvis down to our lower knee, becomes too taught. Ways to prevent this injury are running on flat surfaces; gradually increasing mileage; and stretching to increase flexibility. All of these measures can help reduce the stress on the IT band and may reduce the pain and chances of future injury.

Experiencing Knee Pain while running? Call us to find out why and what’s the cure? 24 Hours Hotline: +65 6471 2744 or SMS to +65 9235 7641 for appointment

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury

Injured your Knee ACL? Suspect your ACL Torn? Get professional opinion about your Knee Injury. Call us +65 6471 2744 or email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg for appointment

Definition of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of four major knee ligaments. The ACL is critical to knee stability, and people who injure their ACL often complain of symptoms of their knee giving-out from under them. Therefore, many patients who sustain an ACL tear opt to have surgical treatment of this injury.

What is the ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament)?

The anterior cruciate ligament, also called the ACL, is one of the four major ligaments of the knee. The ACL prevents excessive motion of the knee joint–patients who sustain an injury to their ACL may complain of symptoms of the knee “giving out.”

Sign of an ACL Tear:

The diagnosis of an ACL tear is made by several methods. Patients who have an ACL tear often have sustained an injury to the knee. The injury is often sports-related. They may have felt a “pop” in their knee, and the knee usually gives-out from under them.

ACL tears cause knee swelling and pain. On examination, your doctor can look for signs of instability of the knee. These special tests place stress on the ACL, and can detect a torn ligament.

An MRI may also be used to determine if the ligament is torn, and also to look for signs of any associated injuries in the knee.

Is ACL surgery necessary?

ACL tears do not necessarily require surgery. There are several important factors to consider before undergoing ACL surgery. First, do you regularly perform activities that normally require a functional ACL? Second, do you experience knee instability? If you don’t do sports that require an ACL, and you don’t have an unstable knee, then you may not need ACL surgery.

There is also a debate about how to treat a partial ACL tear. If the ACL is not completely torn, then ACL reconstruction surgery may not be necessary.

Many patients with an ACL tear start to feel better within a few weeks of the injury. These individuals may feel as though their knee is normal again, but the problems with instability may persist.

Surgery of an ACL tear:

The usual surgery for an ACL tear is called an ACL reconstruction. A repair of the ligament is rarely a possibility, and thus the ligament is reconstructed using another tendon or ligament to substitute for the torn ligament.

There are several options for how to perform ACL surgery. The most significant choice is the type of graft used to reconstruct the torn ACL. There are also variations in the procedure, such as the new ‘double-bundle’ ACL reconstruction.

Risks of ACL surgery include infection, persistent instability and pain, stiffness, and difficulty returning to your previous level of activity. The good news is that better than 90% of patients have no complications with ACL surgery.

Read more about Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstuction

Read more about Should My Child Have ACL Surgery

Read more about Getting Back to Sports after ACL Injuries

Read more about Other Ligament Injuries

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