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Spinal Stenosis

Are you suffering from Spinal Stenosis? Having lower back pain with leg pain and numbness? You are at the right place. Get professional opinion and treatment on your Spinal Stenosis. Call us for appointment today. Tel: +65 64712744 or SMS to: +65 92357641 (24 Hours Hotline).

There are two types of spinal stenosis: lumbar stenosis and cervical stenosis. While lumbar spinal stenosis is more common, cervical spinal stenosis is often more dangerous because it involves compression of the spinal cord, as explained below in more detail.

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis VS Cervical Spinal Stenosis

  • In lumbar stenosis, the spinal nerve roots in the lower back are compressed, or choked, and this can produce symptoms of sciatica — tingling, weakness or numbness that radiates from the low back and into the buttocks and legs – especially with activity.
  • Spinal stenosis pain in the neck (cervical spinal stenosis) can be far more dangerous by compressing the spinal cord. Spinal cord stenosis may lead to serious symptoms, including major body weakness or even paralysis. Such severe spinal stenosis symptoms are virtually impossible in the lumbar spine, however, as the spinal cord is not present in the lumbar spine.

In rare cases, lumbar stenosis can go no further than to produce severe persistent disabling pain and even weakness in the legs. Most cases of stenosis in the lumbar spine, however, have pain that radiates into the leg(s) with walking, and that pain will be relieved with sitting.

Spinal Stenosis

Spinal Stenosis in Older Patients

Spinal stenosis is related to degeneration in the spine and usually will become significant in the 5th decade of life and extend throughout every subsequent age group. Most patients first visit their doctor with symptoms of spinal stenosis at about age 60 or so. Patients need only seek treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis if they no longer wish to live with significant activity limitations, such as leg pain and/or difficulty with walking.

Spinal stenosis can occur in a variety of ways in the spine. Approximately 75% of cases of spinal stenosis occur in the lumbar spine (low back), which is called lumbar spinal stenosis, and most will affect the sciatic nerve which runs along the back of the leg. When this happens, it is commonly called sciatica.

Common Symptom of Spinal Stenosis

Leg pain with walking (claudication) can be caused by either arterial circulatory insufficiency (vascular claudication) or from spinal stenosis (neurogenic or pseudo-claudication). Leg pain from either condition will go away with rest, but with spinal stenosis the patient usually has to sit down for a few minutes to ease the leg and often low back pain, whereas leg pain from vascular claudication will go away if the patient simply stops walking.

Although occasionally the leg pain and stenosis symptoms will come on acutely, they generally develop over the course of several years. The longer a patient with spinal stenosis stands or walks, the worse the leg pain will get.

Common Treatment of Spinal Stenosis

Depending on the severity of symptoms, spinal stenosis can often be managed through non-surgical treatments.

The three most common non-surgical spinal stenosis treatments include:

  • Exercise
  • Activity modification
  • Epidural injections

Fortunately, spinal stenosis surgery outcomes for decompression can be among the most rewarding surgical methods used on the spine (second only to removal of some herniated discs). Generally patients do well after decompression surgery and are able to increase their activity following recovery from spinal stenosis surgery. Many patients have a better walking tolerance following back surgery for spinal stenosis.

Are you suffering from Spinal Stenosis? Having lower back pain with leg pain and numbness? You are at the right place. Get professional opinion and treatment on your Spinal Stenosis. Call us for appointment today. Tel: +65 64712744 or SMS to: +65 92357641 (24 Hours Hotline).

Guide to Low Back Pain

What Is Low Back Pain?

Low back pain is a universal human experience — almost everyone has it at some point. The lower back, which starts below the ribcage, is called the lumbar region. Pain here can be intense and is one of the top causes of missed work. Fortunately, low back pain often gets better on its own. When it doesn’t, there are effective treatments.

Symptoms of Low Back Pain

Symptoms range from a dull ache to a stabbing or shooting sensation. The pain may make it hard to move or stand up straight. Acute back pain comes on suddenly, often after an injury from sports or heavy lifting. Pain that lasts more than three months is considered chronic. If your pain is not better within 72 hours, you should consult a doctor.

Symptoms That Require Urgent Care

Severe back pain after a fall or injury should be checked out by a health care professional. Other warning signs include a loss of bowel or bladder control, leg weakness, fever, and pain when coughing or urinating. If you have any of these symptoms along with your back pain, contact your doctor.

Muscle Strain or Sciatica?

The kind of back pain that follows heavy lifting or exercising too hard is often caused by muscle strain. But sometimes back pain can be related to a disc that bulges or ruptures. If a bulging or ruptured disc presses on the sciatic nerve, pain may run from the buttock down one leg. This is called sciatica.

Back Pain Culprit: Your Job

If your job involves lifting, pulling, or anything that twists the spine, it may contribute to back pain. However, sitting at a desk all day comes with risks of its own, especially if your chair is uncomfortable or you tend to slouch.

Back Pain Culprit: Your Bag

Although you may wear your purse, backpack, or briefcase over your shoulder, it is the lower back that supports the upper body — including any additional weight you carry. So an overstuffed bag can strain the lower back, especially if you carry it day after day. If you must tote a heavy load, consider switching to a wheeled briefcase.

Back Pain Culprit: Your Workout

Overdoing it at the gym or golf course is one of the most common causes of overextended muscles leading to low back pain. You’re especially vulnerable if you tend to be inactive during the work week and then spend hours at the gym or softball field on the weekend.

Back Pain Culprit: Your Posture

Mom was right when she said, “Stand up straight!” Your back supports weight best when you don’t slouch. This means sitting with good lumbar support for your lower back, shoulders back, with feet resting on a low stool. When standing, keep weight evenly balanced on both feet.

Back Pain Culprit: Herniated Disc

The spine’s vertebrae are cushioned by gel-like discs that are prone to wear and tear from aging or injuries. A weakened disc may rupture or bulge, putting pressure on the spinal nerve roots. This is known as a herniated disc and can cause intense pain.

Back Pain Culprit: Chronic Conditions

Several chronic conditions can lead to low back pain.

  • Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the space around the spinal cord, which can put pressure on the spinal nerves.
  • Spondylitis refers to chronic back pain and stiffness due to severe inflammation of the spinal joints.
  • Fibromyalgia causes widespread muscle aches, including back pain.

Who’s at Risk for Low Back Pain?

Most people get their first taste of low back pain in their 30s. The odds of additional attacks increase with age. Other reasons your low back may hurt include:

  • Being overweight
  • Inactive lifestyle
  • Jobs that require heavy lifting

Diagnosing Low Back Pain

To help your doctor diagnose the source of low back pain, be specific in describing the type of pain, when it started, related symptoms, and any history of chronic conditions. Your doctor may order X-rays, CT or MRI scans to look for damaged bones or discs, or other injuries to the spine.

Home Care for Low Back Pain

Back pain due to muscle strain will usually get better on its own, but you can take steps to make yourself more comfortable. A heating pad or warm baths may provide temporary pain relief.

The Bed Rest Debate

When your back hurts, you may not feel like getting out of bed. But if the problem is muscle strain, doctors recommend returning to your normal activities as soon as possible. Studies suggest that any more than a day or two of bed rest can actually make the pain worse and may reduce muscle tone and flexibility.

Yoga

If back pain doesn’t go away in three months, there’s evidence that yoga can help. In one recent study, people who took 12 weeks of yoga classes had fewer symptoms of low back pain than people who were given a book about care for back pain. The benefits lasted several months after the classes were finished. The study suggests conventional stretching also works just as well. Make sure your instructor is experienced at teaching people with back pain and will modify postures for you as needed.

Medications

Mild back pain often feels better with over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen. Pain-relieving creams may be helpful for muscle aches. For severe pain or chronic pain, your doctor may recommend prescription medication.

Injections

If simpler therapies and medications aren’t helping, your doctor may recommend injections to the back. One procedure, called a nerve root block, targets irritated nerves. Injections for back pain usually contain steroid medication.

Surgery

If long-lasting back pain is interfering with your daily life, and other treatments have not provided relief, you may be a candidate for surgery. Depending on the cause of your pain, a surgeon may remove a herniated disc, widen the space around the spinal cord, and/or fuse two spinal vertebrae together.

Physical Therapy

If back pain has left you inactive for a long time, a rehabilitation program can help you strengthen your muscles and get back to your daily activities. A physical therapist can guide you through stretches, strength exercises, and low-impact cardio that will help you be fitter without straining your back.

Strengthening the Back

Two types of strength-training moves that may benefit the lower back are flexion and extension exercises. In flexion exercises, you bend forward to stretch the muscles of the back and hips. In extension exercises, you bend backward to develop the muscles that support the spine. One example is doing leg lifts while lying on your stomach. Depending on the cause of your back pain, there are some exercises you should not do. If you have back pain, make sure to talk to your doctor about what exercises are safe for you.

Preventing Low Back Pain

There’s no sure way to prevent back pain as you age, but there are steps you can take to lower your risk:

  • Stay at a healthy weight.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Lift with your legs, not your back.
  • Make sure your work station position isn’t contributing to your pain.

CURE YOUR BACK PAIN TODAY. CALL US AT +65 64712744 OR EMAIL TO: INFO@BONECLINIC.COM.SG FOR APPOINTMENT

Patient Guide to Lower Back Pain

Lower back pain can be acute or severely painful or can be a long term moderate pain from a chronic back injury.

We explain the differences between acute low back pain and moderate chronic low back and its management.

Often is not possible to completely diagnose the causes of low back pain. Below we also outline the most common diagnosable causes of low back pain, less common causes and other conditions which can cause low back pain.

Acute VS Chronic Low Back Pain

Acute low back pain is severe back pain and usually comes on suddenly caused by a movement such as bending or twisting. Pain in the lower back and buttocks may increase over a couple of hours as inflammation develops. Management of acute low back pain is to reduce pain as quickly as possible by getting the patient into a position of least pain which may be lying on the back, front or side. Whatever is most comfortable is the best and it will be different for each individual. See management of acute low back pain for more detailed information.

Mild or moderate lower back pain is associated with chronic or long term back problems which are usually caused initially by an injury, usually to the joints in the back but over time other structures in particular soft tissue such as muscles contribute to the pain. A range of symptoms include dull aching in the lower back which may come and go, be on one side or across the lower back. There will be reduced range of movement, tenderness at points on the spine, muscle spasms and pain may radiate into the buttocks and hamstrings.

Common Causes of Low Back Pain

Often the exact cause of low back pain is not possible to identify. Symptoms can be vague, come and go and there can be a number of tissues and structures causing the pain. However below are some injuries and conditions that can usually be diagnosed.

SciaticaSciatica or nerve route compression causes pain in the lower back which radiates down into the legs. There are a number of causes by a slipped disc is one of the more common causes.

Facet joint pain or zygapophysial joints as they are also know are synovial joints in the spine which allow movement and help support the spine. Symptoms of facet joint pain include muscle spasm at the side of the spine which pulls the vertibra out of line. Patients will often report a sudden pain when bending over or moving.

Spondylolysis or stress fracture of the pars interarticularis is an overuse injury more common in younger athletes who are involved in sports requiring a lot of bending backwards and rotation of the spine such as javelin throwing, tennis, baseball pitching and fast  bowling in cricket. Symptoms include lower back pain often on one side of the back. Pain is worse during activities requiring backwards bending of the spine or exaggerating the lumbar curve in the spine. Tenderness will be felt over the site of the fracture when pressing in.

Sacroiliac jointSacroiliac joint pain occurs when the joint between the sacrum at the bottom of the spine and the ilium bone of the pelvis is not functioning correctly. It can be locked and not moving freely or it may be that there is too much movement in the joint. Symptoms of sacroiliac joint pain include pain located at either the left or right side of the lower back, not not usually both sides. The pain can vary from a dull ache to a sharp stabbing pain which can radiate into the buttocks. Occasionally sacroiliac joint dysfunction can cause pain in the testicles. Stiffness in the lower back when getting up after sitting for long periods and when getting up from bed in the morning is also common.

Muscular trigger points are tiny localized knots in the muscle which cause pain either at the location of the trigger point or referred elsewhere in the back. They are common in the errector spinae muscles which go up either side of the spine and the deep quadratus lumborum muscles either side of the lumbar spine. Deep tissue sports massage techniques are effective for releasing trigger points in the muscles and relieving muscular back pain.

Less Common Causes of Low Back Pain

Spondylolisthesis is most common in children aged between 9 and 14 years old and involves a slipping forward of one of the lumbar vertebra. Spondylolisthesis can vary in severity from a grade one where there may be no symptoms or pain at all and patients are unaware they have the condition to a grade two which may result in low back pain made worse by activity but not radiating into the legs. A grade three injury has greater than 50% forward movement of the vertebra and a grade 4 will be very debilitating with more than 75% movement in the bone.

Spinal canal stenosis is more common in older athletes and involves the spinal canal narrowing causing pressure on the nerves with symptoms of pain and numbness. Sciatic type symptoms may also be present along with weakness of the legs. An X-ray of the spine can confirm the diagnosis.

Fractured vertebra or compression fracture of the spine is a break or fracture of one of the vertebra bones and is usually due to compressive forces. Occurring most frequently in the lower back symptoms include pain at the site of the fracture which may radiate in the hips, buttocks or thighs. Numbness, tingling and weakness may also be experienced and bladder or bowel symptoms from the fracture pressing onto the spinal cord can occur.

Fibromyalgia is a widespread muscular fatigue and pain condition where pain and tenderness is felt throughout the body. Poor sleep patterns are common and the muscles may feel soft and doughy rather than toned and tight. Patients often complain that they ache all over or feel they have overworked the muscles. Irritable bowel syndrome, Dysmenorrhea (cramps or painful menstruation) and chronic headaches are also symptoms of fibromylagia.

Lumbar instability is where part of the spine is unstable or has too much movement. Most low back problems can be relieved by freeing up a hypomobile vertebra or one that has restricted movement, although mobilizing and already mobile joint is not going to be beneficial. In this case the surrounding structures and muscles should be strengthened to support the unstable back. Core strengthening exercises and Pilates exercises for the back are likely to be beneficial. It is possible to have a generally hypomobile spine but with one or two vertebra having restricted mobility. It is important to get an accurate diagnosis and treatment from a back specialist, Osteopath or Chiropractor as the wrong treatment or exercises can have a negative effect.

Other medical conditions and diseases that can have symptoms of lower back pain include rheumatological diseases, gynacologica, gastrointestinal as well as genitourinary problems. If in doubt seek advice from a doctor.

STOP YOUR BACK PAIN TODAY. CALL US AT 6471 2744 OR EMAIL TO: INFO@BONECLINIC.COM.SG TO SCHEDULE FOR AN APPOINTMENT

Neck Pain after Long Hours in Computer

Did you know that spending long hours at your computer can put your health at serious risk? Most people does not even consider that possibility, but t does, Working at a desk is extremely hard on your body, and I would like to share this with you so maybe you can avoid some of the most common health risks. One of the most common one is: NECK PAIN

Tips for NECK PAIN relief

Neck pain can really get irritating if it persists for long periods of time. The pain can get unbearable that’s why some people succumb to taking medications or pain relievers only to find out that they don’t do them any good. Let’s check out these simple and basic tips on how to treat and relieve you from neck pain.

1. Get spinal checkups regularly. It is very important to always keep your spine aligned. This can ensure the proper functioning of your neck and back, specifically the upper region. Physiotherapy will do spinal adjustments on you. This can decrease the stress on your thoracic and cervical spines. It also improves the communication between your brain and all parts of the body. As a result, a happier and healthier you.

2. Always be conscious of your posture. There are a lot of people who exhibit poor posture. When asked to stand up straight, they are unable to exude the proper posture anymore. This is because they have been used to that kind of posture and they are unaware of it already. Proper posture does not only involve the back, as lot may think. It also includes the neck. Poor posture, if not dealt with can give rise to neck pain as well.

3. Exercise regularly. Exercising does not only do good to the body’s muscular and cardiovascular system but to the skeletal system, too. For an efficient and effective program, you have to do at least three sessions a week for about forty minutes. In order to be more inspired to do these exercises, involve the whole family and your friends. It will benefit, not only yourself, but your loved ones as well.

4. Eat well and eat right. Naturally, you keep your body healthy by eating the right food at the right amount. When you observe proper diet and nutrition, your body will the given the appropriate energy or fuel that can increase your endurance and performance. It can also increase your body’s immune system to fight injuries and sickness. It can speep your recovery from injury and it also makes you feel good. If you are having a hard time eating right, you might as well consider taking up dietary supplements to cover up for vitamin and mineral deficiencies in your body.

5. Manage stress. There are a lot of techniques devised to relieve stress, if not to eliminate it totally. Usually, stress is carried on the upper back, the shoulders, and the neck. If you prefer, go to your nearest orthopaedics to ask about these techniques and how to do them the right way.

6. Do not put pressure on your neck. For example, while using the telephone, do not use your neck and shoulders to hold it while you talk. In the office, always sit properly and keep your neck straight by working at eye level. You can unconsciously get neck pain during sleep because you are unaware of your movements. You can use a cervical pillow for this. You can also roll a towel and put it around the curve of your neck while you sleep. Never sleep on your stomach.

7. Stretch. It is always best to do stretching if possible. In the office or at home, you can take short breaks just to reduce the tension. Some massage won’t hurt either. It can decrease the tension not only on your shoulders but also on your neck.

Do not let yourself get weighed down by neck pain. If you are one of those people suffering from neck pain, do not fret. There are a lot of simple techniques and remedies you can get and use wherever you may be.

There are other risks as you sit in front of that computer but it would be to much to write about in this article, so if you would like to learn more about other risks such as:

Eye strain RSI (Repetitive Stress Syndrome) Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Constant Head Aches Dizziness Breathing Problems Difficulty Concentrating

CURE YOUR NECK PAIN TODAY! CALL +65 6471 2744 or Email to info@boneclinic.com.sg for Appointment

Back Pain

Most people suffer from mild back pain from time to time and the exact cause of which may be difficult to diagnose. It is usually a sign that one or more muscles, joints, ligaments or discs are over-stretched or twisted by movement of the back in an awkward position. Severe pain may be the result of pressure on nerves from the misalignment of the bones in the back and warrants immediate medical attention.

Low back pain afflicts some 80 % of the adult population some time or other in their lives.

Many episodes of pain last only several hours or a day or two. By and large, 90% of patients should have recovered from their initial attack of pain by 6 weeks from the onset.

Symptoms

Early medical attention is necessary if certain symptoms (“red flags”) are present:

  • Constant pain with no significant relief at rest
  • Aggravated by bending in all directions
  • Localisable severe pain to a single spot on the back
  • Progressively severe pain over days/weeks
  • Persistent nerve pains, pain or sensation of numbness, pins & needles aching in one or both legs
  • Weakness of legs, difficulty in walking, unsteady walking
  • Bladder/bowel problems associated with back pain (difficulty in passing urine – incontinence)
  • General symptoms of poor health, loss of appetite, weight loss, lethargy, fever and chills
  • Previous history of cancer

Treatment

Rest is very crucial for patients with episodic attacks of back pain. Rest here may involve going home and lying down for a few hours, or it may be as simple as keeping the back straight and avoiding further stress to the back in the form of bending, lifting and sitting. In severe attacks, lying down for a day or two may significantly reduce the severity of the pain. If it does not, further bed -rest is not helpful.

Physical therapy is very important in the treatment and prevention of low back pain. In the initial period of acute back pain, combinations of heat, traction, manual treatment, and other techniques may help to rapidly reduce the severity of pain and stiffness. As pain subsides, exercises, to relieve stress and strengthen the back ,are gradually introduced. Regularity of such exercises can help to further reduce the pain, as well as protect the back from unhealthy stress and recurrent attacks of pain.

Different types of medications may be prescribed for different types of back pain.

In acute sciatica or leg pain associated with back disorders, the acute irritation of the nerve may be reduced by taking NSAIDS regularly for a short period of time. NSAIDS are often prescribed purely for pain relief rather than for anti-inflammatory effects. It is based on an as-required basis. These drugs are to be avoided if there is a history of allergy and kidney problems. In most cases, NSAIDS are well-tolerated, though most of them provoke gastric symptoms. The doctor must always be consulted.

Muscle relaxants help to reduce muscle spasm and stiffness that occurs during a pain attack. Sedatives and tranquilisers may be taken at night to ensure a restful sleep.

Ice packs, hot packs or heating lamps, ointments that usually contain methyl -salicylate and medicated plasters of various kinds may help.

30 – 40 % of patients suffer a relapse during the first few months following the attack. It is important to identify the factors that aggravated the pain.

I have severe back pain and sciatica that has not improved even with treatment. What should I do?

X-rays of the low-back should be obtained. Conditions like spondylolisthesis, infection and tumour should be excluded. Sophisticated imaging techniques such as MRI ( magnetic resonance imaging) may be required . MRI scans can show the severity of a prolapsed disc and more importantly , the degree of the nerve compression, if any. Other investigations such as bone scan, CT scans or myelograms may be performed in certain conditions.

Prevention

Recommendations for prevention of low back pain:

  • Try to modify the activity so that it is less likely to strain the back
  • Interrupt a repetitive task frequently by standing and stretching. This helps to reduce the stress on the back from building up to critical levels
  • Exercise programmes must be balanced to exercise all parts of the body, including the back.
  • Exercises should be done frequently in measured doses.

Slipped Disc

As a person gets older, a process called degeneration, the nucleus in the lower few discs of the low back . As a result , the discs are less capable of cushioning the spine , especially during repeated stressful activities. The capsule or annulus can then tear and cause pain. This is known as a slipped disc.

In a slipped disc, the annulus tears with different degrees of severity. Small tears heal quickly. Large tears can cause a small portion of the nucleus herniating through the tear to lie outside the wall of the disc. If this herniation is close to a nerve, intense irritation of the nerve can occur. “Sciatica “or feelings of pain, aching, numbness, “coldness ‘, paraesthesia or pins and needles of the thigh and calf may occur. This can involve one or both legs. Properly performed manual treatment using massage, mobilisation and manipulation may often be helpful in reducing the severity of low back pain.

Most cases recover without the need for surgery. As mentioned earlier, 90 % patients recover within 6 weeks. However a small group of patients have a significant portion of the nucleus that has herniated out of the annulus of the disc to compress the nerve and removal of the herniated fragment of disc will result in more rapid recovery of symptoms than without.

Frequently Asked Questions

Aside from a prolapsed disc, what other causes of recurrent back and leg pains are there?

Spinal canal stenosis and spondylolisthesis are 2 other common causes of recurrent back and leg pains . In older people, a condition termed as lumbar spondylosis, ( the facet joints of the spine can wear out ) can result in episodic back pains. Osteoporosis or softening of the bones can occur in the elderly, resulting in back pains. Patients who have had a previous history of cancer elsewhere, and having persistent back pains, should seek a medical opinion. Less commonly conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylosis and various types of infections can also afflict the spine.

My back is often sore at the end of a day’s work. How can I prevent this?

Modification of activity or the work environment may be required. It is often how the person does that results in unnecessary stress to the back. Such instruction can be provided by the doctor or the therapist , either as an individual or in groups of patients attending “Back Care ” classes.

I am already doing a full day’s work. I also jog and play tennis Why do I need other exercises?

Work, no matter how strenous, is not exercise. In fact, some jobs especially those that involve repeated lifting or bending, or prolonged standing or sitting, add to the stress over the spine. Jogging, racquet games, golf, etc. may be good for general health and fitness but do not significantly exercise or strengthen the back. A balanced programme which includes improving the flexibility and strength of the back will help to prevent recurrent injuries.

STOP your Back Pain today! Call +65 6471 2744 or Email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg for Appointment

Back Pain

Back pain usually affects the lower back. It can be a short-term problem, lasting a few days or weeks, or continue for many months or even years. Most people will have some form of back pain at some stage in their lives.

If your back pain is non-specific, your doctor will recommend you try self-help measures. Alternatively, he or she may prescribe medicines or refer you for physical therapy if your pain is severe or chronic. If, however, your doctor suspects you have a specific underlying cause, he or she may refer you to have spinal injections. These are used to find out the exact source of, and also to treat, your back pain but aren’t suitable for everyone.

Self-help

There are a number of things you can do to help relieve low back pain.

  • Stay active and continue your daily activities as normally as you can. Bed rest may actually make low back pain worse, so try to limit the time you spend resting to a minimum.
  • Apply hot or cold packs to the affected area. You can buy specially designed hot and cold packs from most pharmacies. If you prefer, you can apply a cold compress, such as ice or a bag of frozen peas, wrapped in a towel. Don’t apply ice directly to your skin as it can damage your skin.

Medicines

Taking an over-the-counter painkiller such as aspirin or paracetamol, or anti-inflammatory medicine is often enough to relieve acute low back pain. You can also use creams, lotions and gels that contain painkillers or anti-inflammatory ingredients. Always read the patient information that comes with your medicine and if you have any questions, ask your pharmacist for advice.

If your pain is severe or chronic, your doctor may prescribe stronger medicines such as diazepam, morphine or tramadol. However, these aren’t suitable for everyone because they can be addictive and cause side-effects. Always ask your doctor for advice and read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine.

Physical therapies

A physiotherapist (physical therapist – a health professional who specialises in maintaining and improving movement and mobility) may be able to help you design a programme to help you exercise and stretch.

Alternatively, your doctor may refer you for physical therapy such as chiropractic treatment or osteopathy (therapies that are given alongside conventional treatments) to help with your back pain. Treatment can involve exercises, posture advice, massage, and techniques known as spinal mobilisation and spinal manipulation.

Surgery

Back pain, even if it’s chronic, can usually be treated or managed successfully, but about one in 10 people have ongoing problems. Back surgery is really only considered as a last resort if the pain is related to a specific cause.

Complementary therapies

Some people find acupuncture can help relieve low back pain.
Alternatively, you could try a pain-management programme to help you better deal with and manage your symptoms.

You should always talk to a doctor before trying any complementary therapy.
Availability and use of different treatments may vary from country to country. Ask your doctor for advice on your treatment options.

Prevention of back pain

Good back care can greatly reduce your risk of getting low back pain. To look after your back, make sure you:

  • take regular exercise – walking and swimming are particularly beneficial
  • try to keep your stress levels to a minimum
  • bend from your knees and hips, not your back
  • maintain good posture – keep your shoulders back and don’t slouch

Stop the pain and get your back checked! Call +65 6471 2744 for appointment / Email: info@boneclinic.com.sg

About Back Pain

Most back pain, especially lower back pain, is caused by simple muscle strains.

Most back pain is caused by simple strains and the main focus of this site is how to prevent recurring back pain by strengthening the muscles that support the spine with back exercises, along with correcting posture, using proper lifting techniques, and understanding the physical limitations of the back. There is also information on a wide range of back pain treatments, including complementary treatments, for the relief of both acute and chronic back pain.

Back Pain, especially in the lower back (lumbar spine), is a problem that most people experience at some time in their lives. The muscles that support the spine are in constant use; even while simply sitting, the muscles are in use to keep one from falling over. The spine also bends, straightens and twists. This constant stress on the back can result in back strain and pain.

The lower back supports most of the weight of the body and is subject to the most mechanical stress. As a result, the lower back is commonly injured. Lower back pain caused by strained muscles or ligaments is the most common type of back pain (sometimes referred to as lumbago).

Though most back pain is caused by muscle or ligament strain, there are other causes such as damage or injury to spinal nerves, bones, or discs. Sciatica, which is not a disease in itself but radiating pain and other symptoms caused by inflammation or compression of the sciatic nerve, can be caused by many conditions. Osteoarthritis of the spine is a common cause of back pain in people over 65 years of age. The incidence of some other back conditions also increases with age. Back pain is sometimes caused by a problem with the kidneys.

If back pain persists for over 3 months, it is considered chronic back pain. That doesn’t mean wait 3 months to see a doctor – an aching back can be a symptom of something that requires immediate attention such as a kidney infection. Back pain that lasts several days should be diagnosed and treated by a physician. It the pain is severe or is accompanied by numbness or pain down the leg, a doctor should be seen immediately.

The severity of back pain does not always correlate with the severity of the injury or damage.

In many cases the cause of back pain is hard to pin down. A simple muscle strain often causes more pain that a herniated disc. Herniated discs can produce intense back pain but often do not produce any symptoms at all. Even in those with damaged discs and spinal joints, the source of the pain may be strained back muscles.

If a doctor recommends surgery to relieve back pain, a second opinion should be sought. If one has a herniated disc, for example, but the herniated disc is not actually the source of the pain, surgery will not help relieve it. (Most herniated discs improve without surgery)

Stress, anxiety, and depression are often linked to back pain. Stress causes muscles to contract, which reduces blood flow to the tissues and often leads to pain. Stress hormones also heighten the perception of pain. There are many ways to relieve stress, from exercising to learning relaxation techniques. For some people, relieving stress is the most effective way to reduce pain.

Back pain can occur suddenly, but more often develops gradually.

For example, when the muscles supporting the back are held in one position (contracted) too long, the back muscles get fatigued and strained. Byproducts of muscular activity (such as lactic acid) build up in the back muscles. High levels of these acidic waste products in the muscles cause muscle irritation and pain.

Recurring back pain is frequently the result of inadequate muscle strength, shortened muscles; poor posture, being overweight, poor bending and lifting techniques. These are all factors that can be controlled .

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