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PATIENT GUIDE TO SHIN SPLINTS

The term “shin splints” refers to pain along or just behind the shinbone (tibia) — the large bone in the front of your lower leg. Medically known as medial tibial stress syndrome, shin splints occur during physical activity and result from too much force being placed on your shinbone and connective tissues that attach your muscles to the bone. Shin splints are common in runners and in those who participate in activities with sudden stops and starts, such as basketball, soccer or tennis.

The risk of shin splints is no reason to give up your morning jog or afternoon aerobics class. Most cases of shin splints can be treated with rest, ice and other self-care measures. Wearing proper footwear and modifying your exercise routine can help prevent shin splints from recurring.

SYMPTOMS OF SHIN SPLINTS:

If you have shin splints, you may notice:

  • Tenderness, soreness or pain along the inner part of your lower leg
  • Mild swelling in your lower leg

At first, the pain may stop when you stop running or exercising. Eventually, however, the pain may be continuous.

When to see a doctor
Consult your doctor if rest, ice and over-the-counter pain relievers don’t ease your shin pain. Your primary care doctor may refer you to an orthopedist. Seek prompt medical care if:

  • Severe pain in your shin follows a fall or accident
  • Your shin is hot and inflamed
  • Swelling in your shin seems to be getting worse
  • Shin pain persists during rest

CAUSES OF SHIN SPLINTS:

Shin splints are caused by excessive force (overload) on the shinbone and the connective tissues that attach your muscles to the bone. The overload is often caused by specific athletic activities, such as:

  • Running downhill
  • Running on a slanted or tilted surface
  • Running in worn-out footwear
  • Engaging in sports with frequent starts and stops, such as basketball and tennis

Shin splints can also be caused by training errors, such as engaging in a running program with the “terrible toos” — running too hard, too fast or for too long.

RISK FACTORS OF SHIN SPLINTS:

You’re more at risk of shin splints if:

  • You’re a runner, especially just beginning a running program
  • You have flat feet or rigid arches, causing your feet to roll inward when running
  • You increase the intensity of your workouts by doing more high-impact activities
  • You play sports on hard surfaces, with sudden stops and starts
  • You’re in military training

TEST AND DIAGNOSIS OF SHIN SPLINTS

Shin splints are usually diagnosed based on your medical history and a physical exam. In some cases, an X-ray or other imaging studies can help identify other possible causes for your pain, such as a stress fracture — tiny cracks in a bone often caused by overuse.

PREVENTION:

To help prevent shin splints:

  • Choose the right shoes. Wear footwear that suits your sport. If you’re a runner, replace your shoes about every 350 to 500 miles (560 to 800 kilometers).
  • Consider arch supports. Arch supports can help prevent the pain of shin splints, especially if you have flat arches.
  • Lessen the impact. Cross-train with a sport that places less impact on your shins, such as swimming, walking or biking. Remember to start new activities slowly. Increase time and intensity gradually.
  • Add strength training to your workout. To strengthen your calf muscles, try toe raises. Stand up. Slowly rise up on your toes, then slowly lower your heels to the floor. Repeat 10 times. When this becomes easy, do the exercise holding progressively heavier weights. Leg presses and other exercises for your lower legs can be helpful, too.

It’s also important to know when to rest; at the first sign of shin pain, take a break.

GET PROFESSIONAL OPINION AND TREATMENT ABOUT YOUR SHIN SPLINT. CALL +65 64712744 or SMS to +65 92357641 FOR APPOINTMENT

Patient Guide to Hamstring Injury

A hamstring injury occurs when you strain or pull one of your hamstring muscles — the group of three muscles that run along the back of your thigh.

You may be more likely to get a hamstring injury if you play soccer, basketball, football, tennis or a similar sport that involves sprinting with sudden stops and starts. Hamstring injury can occur in runners and in dancers as well.

Self-care measures such as rest, ice and over-the-counter pain medications are often all you need to relieve the pain and swelling associated with a hamstring injury. Rarely, surgery may be needed to repair a torn muscle.

SYMPTOMS OF HAMSTRING INJURY:

A hamstring injury typically causes a sudden, sharp pain in the back of your thigh. You might also feel a popping or tearing sensation. Swelling and tenderness usually develop within a few hours. You may also experience bruising or discoloration along the back of your leg, as well as muscle weakness or an inability to put weight on your injured leg.

When to see a doctor
Mild hamstring strains can be treated at home. But you should see a doctor if you can’t bear any weight on your injured leg or if you can’t walk more than four steps without significant pain.

CAUSES OF HAMSTRING INJURY:

The hamstring muscles are a group of three muscles that run along the back of your thigh from your hip to just below your knee. These muscles make it possible to extend your leg straight behind your body and to bend your knee. When any one of these muscles stretches beyond its limit during physical activity, injury can result.

RISK FACTORS:

Hamstring injury risk factors include:

  • Sports participation. Sports that require sprinting or running, or other activities such as dancing that might require extreme stretching, make a hamstring injury more likely.
  • Prior hamstring injury. After you’ve had one hamstring injury, you’re more likely to have another one, especially if you try to resume all your activities at pre-injury levels of intensity before your muscles have time to heal and rebuild strength.
  • Poor flexibility. If you have poor flexibility, your muscles may not be able to bear the full force of the action required during certain activities.
  • Muscle imbalance. Although not all experts agree, some suggest that a muscle imbalance may lead to hamstring injury. When the muscles along the front of your thigh — the quadriceps — become stronger and more developed than your hamstring muscles, you may be more likely to injure your hamstring muscles.

COMPLICATIONS:

Returning to strenuous activities before your hamstring muscles are completely healed might cause an injury recurrence. In some cases, a recurrent hamstring injury may be more severe than the original injury.

CURE YOUR HAMSTRING INJURY TODAY. CALL +65 6471 2744 for Appointment (24 Hours) or Email to info@boneclinic.com.sg