(65) 64712744|milda@bone.com.sg

Heel Pain Clinic

Heel pain is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, a condition that is sometimes also called heel spur syndrome when a spur is present. Heel pain may also be due to other causes, such as a stress fracture, tendonitis, arthritis, nerve irritation, or, rarely, a cyst.

Because there are several potential causes, it is important to have heel pain properly diagnosed. A foot and ankle surgeon is able to distinguish between all the possibilities and determine the underlying source of your heel pain.

Plantar Fasciitis and Heel Spur

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?
Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the band of tissue (the plantar fascia) that extends from the heel to the toes. In this condition, the fascia first becomes irritated and then inflamed, resulting in heel pain.

Causes
The most common cause of plantar fasciitis relates to faulty structure of the foot. For example, people who have problems with their arches, either overly flat feet or high-arched feet, are more prone to developing plantar fasciitis.

Wearing non-supportive footwear on hard, flat surfaces puts abnormal strain on the plantar fascia and can also lead to plantar fasciitis. This is particularly evident when one’s job requires long hours on the feet. Obesity may also contribute to plantar fasciitis.

Symptoms
The symptoms of plantar fasciitis are:

  • Pain on the bottom of the heel
  • Pain in the arch of the foot
  • Pain that is usually worse upon arising
  • Pain that increases over a period of months

People with plantar fasciitis often describe the pain as worse when they get up in the morning or after they’ve been sitting for long periods of time. After a few minutes of walking the pain decreases, because walking stretches the fascia. For some people the pain subsides but returns after spending long periods of time on their feet.

Diagnosis
To arrive at a diagnosis, the foot and ankle surgeon will obtain your medical history and examine your foot. Throughout this process the surgeon rules out all the possible causes for your heel pain other than plantar fasciitis.

In addition, diagnostic imaging studies such as x-rays or other imaging modalities may be used to distinguish the different types of heel pain. Sometimes heel spurs are found in patients with plantar fasciitis, but these are rarely a source of pain. When they are present, the condition may be diagnosed as plantar fasciitis/heel spur syndrome.

Non-Surgical Treatment
Treatment of plantar fasciitis begins with first-line strategies, which you can begin at home:

  • Stretching exercises. Exercises that stretch out the calf muscles help ease pain and assist with recovery.
  • Avoid going barefoot. When you walk without shoes, you put undue strain and stress on your plantar fascia.
  • Ice. Putting an ice pack on your heel for 20 minutes several times a day helps reduce inflammation. Place a thin towel between the ice and your heel; do not apply ice directly to the skin.
  • Limit activities. Cut down on extended physical activities to give your heel a rest.
  • Shoe modifications. Wearing supportive shoes that have good arch support and a slightly raised heel reduces stress on the plantar fascia.
  • Medications. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be recommended to reduce pain and inflammation.

If you still have pain after several weeks, see your foot and ankle surgeon, who may add one or more of these treatment approaches:

  • Padding and strapping. Placing pads in the shoe softens the impact of walking. Strapping helps support the foot and reduce strain on the fascia.
  • Orthotic devices. Custom orthotic devices that fit into your shoe help correct the underlying structural abnormalities causing the plantar fasciitis.
  • Injection therapy. In some cases, injections are used to help reduce the inflammation and relieve pain.
  • Removable walking cast. A removable walking cast may be used to keep your foot immobile for a few weeks to allow it to rest and heal.
  • Night splint. Wearing a night splint allows you to maintain an extended stretch of the plantar fascia while sleeping. This may help reduce the morning pain experienced by some patients.
  • Physical therapy. Exercises and other physical therapy measures may be used to help provide relief.

When Is Surgery Needed?
Although most patients with plantar fasciitis respond to non-surgical treatment, a small percentage of patients may require surgery. If, after several months of non-surgical treatment, you continue to have heel pain, surgery will be considered. Your foot and ankle surgeon will discuss the surgical options with you and determine which approach would be most beneficial for you.

Long-term Care
No matter what kind of treatment you undergo for plantar fasciitis, the underlying causes that led to this condition may remain. Therefore, you will need to continue with preventive measures. Wearing supportive shoes, stretching, and using custom orthotic devices are the mainstay of long-term treatment for plantar fasciitis.

CURE YOUR HEEL PAIN TODAY. GET A FOOT SPECIALIST TO RULE OUT THE CAUSES AND CURE OF YOUR HEEL PAIN. CALL US +65 64712744 OR SMS TO +65 92357641 FOR APPOINTMENT

Sprained Ankle Clinic

A sprained ankle is an injury that occurs when you roll, twist or turn your ankle in an awkward way. This can stretch or tear the tough bands of tissue (ligaments) that help hold your ankle bones together.

Ligaments help stabilize joints, preventing excessive movement. A sprained ankle occurs when the ligaments are forced beyond their normal range of motion. Most sprained ankles involve injuries to the ligaments on the outer side of the ankle.

Treatment for a sprained ankle depends on the severity of the injury. Although self-care measures and over-the-counter pain medications may be all you need, a medical evaluation might be necessary to reveal how badly you’ve sprained your ankle and to put you on the right path to recovery.

Signs and Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of a sprained ankle include:

  • Pain, especially when you bear weight on the affected foot
  • Swelling and, sometimes, bruising
  • Restricted range of motion

Some people hear or feel a “pop” at the time of injury.

When to see a doctor

Call your doctor if you have pain and swelling in your ankle and you suspect a sprain. Self-care measures may be all you need, but talk to your doctor to discuss whether you should have your ankle evaluated. If your signs and symptoms are severe, it’s possible you may have broken a bone in your ankle or lower leg.

Causes

A sprain occurs when your ankle is forced to move out of its normal position, which can cause one or more of the ankle’s ligaments to stretch or tear.

Examples of situations that can result in an ankle sprain include:

  • A fall that causes your ankle to twist
  • Landing awkwardly on your foot after jumping or pivoting
  • Walking or exercising on an uneven surface

Rick Factors

actors that increase your risk of a sprained ankle include:

  • Sports participation. Ankle sprains are a common sports injury. Sports that require rolling or twisting your foot, such as basketball, tennis, football, soccer and trail running, can make you vulnerable to spraining your ankle, particularly if you’re overweight. Playing sports on an uneven surface also can increase your risk.
  • Prior ankle injury. Once you’ve sprained your ankle, or had another type of ankle injury, you’re more likely to sprain it again.

 Complications:

If a sprained ankle is left untreated, if you engage in activities too soon after spraining your ankle or if you sprain your ankle repeatedly, you may experience the following complications:

  • Chronic pain
  • Chronic ankle joint instability
  • Early-onset arthritis in that joint

Many people don’t seek medical attention for mild ankle sprains. If your sprain is severe, however, your family doctor may refer you to a doctor who specializes in sports medicine or orthopedic surgery.

What you can do

You may want to write a list that includes:

  • Detailed descriptions of your symptoms
  • Information about medical problems you’ve had, especially past ankle injuries
  • Information about the medical problems of your parents or siblings
  • All the medications and dietary supplements you take
  • Questions you want to ask the doctor

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor may ask some of the following questions:

  • How exactly did the injury occur?
  • Which direction did your foot turn when you injured it?
  • Can you bear weight on that foot?

Tests and Diagnosis:

During the physical exam, your doctor will check for points of tenderness. He or she will move the joint in a variety of ways to check your range of motion and to see if any particular position or movement causes pain.

If the injury is severe, your doctor may recommend one or more of the following imaging scans to rule out a broken bone or to more precisely evaluate the soft tissue damage:

  • X-ray. During an X-ray, a small amount of radiation passes through your body to produce images of your internal structures. This test is good for evaluating bones, but is less effective at visualizing soft tissues. Tiny cracks or stress fractures in bones may not show up, especially at first, on regular X-rays.
  • Bone scan. For a bone scan, a technician will inject a small amount of radioactive material into an intravenous line. The radioactive material is attracted to your bones, especially the parts of your bones that have been damaged. Damaged areas show up as bright spots on an image taken by a scanner. Bone scans are good at detecting stress fractures.
  • Computerized tomography (CT). CT scans are useful because they can reveal more detail about the bones of the joint. CT scans take X-rays from many different angles and combine them to make cross-sectional images of internal structures of your body.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRIs use radio waves and a strong magnetic field to produce detailed images of internal structures. This technology is exceptionally good at visualizing soft tissue injuries.

Treatments and Drugs:

Treatment for a sprained ankle depends on the severity of your injury. Many people simply treat their injury at home.

Medications

In most cases, over-the-counter pain relievers  are enough to handle the pain caused by a sprained ankle.

Therapy

A few days after your injury, after the swelling has gone down, you may want to see a physical therapist and start performing exercises to restore your ankle’s range of motion, strength, flexibility and balance.

Balance and stability training is especially important to retrain the ankle muscles to work together to support the joint. These exercises may involve various degrees of balance challenge, such as standing on one leg.

If you sprained your ankle while exercising or participating in a sport, talk to your doctor about when you can begin your activity again. You may need to wear an ankle brace or wrap your ankle to protect it from re-injury.

Surgical and other procedures

If your ankle joint is unstable, your doctor may refer you to a joint specialist for evaluation. You may need a cast or walking boot to immobilize your joint so that it can heal properly. In rare cases of severe ligament tears, or if you are an elite athlete, you may need surgery to repair the damage.

Lifestyle and Home Remedies

For immediate self-care of an ankle sprain, try the R.I.C.E. approach:

  • Rest. Avoid activities that cause pain, swelling or discomfort. But don’t avoid all physical activity. Instead, give yourself relative rest. With an ankle sprain, you can usually still exercise other muscles to prevent deconditioning. For example, you could use an exercise bicycle, working both your arms and the uninjured leg while resting the injured ankle on a footrest. That way you still exercise three limbs and keep up your cardiovascular conditioning.
  • Ice. Even if you’re seeking medical help, ice the area immediately. Use an ice pack or slush bath for 15 to 20 minutes and repeat every two to three hours while you’re awake, for the first 48 to 72 hours. Cold reduces pain, swelling and inflammation in injured muscles, joints and connective tissues. It also may slow bleeding if a tear has occurred. If the area turns white, stop treatment immediately. This could indicate a cold injury. If you have vascular disease, diabetes or decreased sensation, talk with your doctor before applying ice.
  • Compression. To help stop swelling, compress the ankle with an elastic bandage until the swelling stops. Don’t wrap it too tightly or you may hinder circulation. Begin wrapping at the end farthest from your heart. Loosen the wrap if the pain increases, if the area becomes numb or if swelling occurs below the wrapped area.
  • Elevation. To reduce swelling, elevate your ankle above the level of your heart, especially at night. Gravity helps reduce swelling by draining excess fluid.

Preventions:

Take the following steps to help prevent a sprained ankle:

  • Warm up before you exercise or play sports.
  • Be careful when walking, running or working on an uneven surface.
  • Wear shoes that fit well and are made for your activity.
  • Don’t wear high-heeled shoes.
  • Don’t play sports or participate in activities for which you are not conditioned.
  • Maintain good muscle strength and flexibility.
  • Practice stability training, including balance exercises.

CURE YOUR ANKLE INJURY TODAY. CALL US AT +65 64712744 or EMAIL TO: info@boneclinic.com.sg FOR APPOINTMENT

Knee Pain Clinic

Are you frustrated with your knee pain that is not getting better? Are you experiencing Knee discomfort after prolong walking, squatting or running? You are in the right place! We certainly able to help with our innovative and non-invasive (non-surgical) form of treatment. Get your knee check today. Call us at (65) 64712744 or SMS to (65) 92357641 to schedule for an appointment

Knee Pain

Knee pain refers to pain that occurs in and around your knee joint. Knee pain can be caused by problems with the knee joint itself, or it can be caused by conditions affecting the soft tissues, ligaments, tendons, or bursae that surround the knee.

The severity of knee pain can vary widely. Some people may feel only a slight twinge, while others may experience debilitating knee pain that interferes with their day-to-day activities. In most cases, self-care measures can help you cope with knee pain.

The knee consists of two long leg-bones held together by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Many knee problems are a result of the aging process and continual wear and stress on the knee joint. Other knee problems result from injury or a sudden movement that stiffens the knee.

Some common conditions of Knee Problem include:

  • ARTHRITIS – Knee pain is a common problem in Asia, especially in individuals above the age of 40. The most common cause of knee pain is degenerative osteoarthritis. Women are more prone to the disease. It is characterized by mild to debilitating pain.

  • LIGAMENT INJURIES – Ligament injuries in the knee; such as an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are dreaded by professional and amateur athletes alike. They can be painful and debilitating. They can even permanently change your lifestyle.

  • MENISCAL TEAR – The meniscus is a small “c” shaped cartilage that acts as a cushion in the knee joint. They sit between the femur and the tibia bone, one on the outside and one on the inside of the knee.

  • PATELLAR TENDONITIS – Patellar tendinitis is a common overuse injury. It occurs when repeated stress is placed on the patellar tendon. The stress results in tiny tears in the tendon, which the body attempts to repair.

  • CHONDROMALACIA PATELLA – Chondromalacia patella is a common cause of kneecap pain or anterior knee pain. Often called “Runner’s Knee,” this condition often affects young, otherwise healthy athletes.

  • DISLOCATING KNEECAPS – Kneecap dislocation occurs when the triangle-shaped bone covering the knee (patella) moves or slides out of place. The problem usually occurs toward the outside of the leg.

  • BAKER’S CYST – A Baker cyst is swelling caused by fluid from the knee joint protruding to the back of the knee. The back of the knee is also referred to as the popliteal area of the knee

  • BURSITIS – A bursa is a closed fluid-filled sac that functions as a gliding surface to reduce friction between tissues of the body.

  • PLICA SYNDROME – Often called “synovial plica syndrome,” this is a condition that is the result of a remnant of fetal tissue in the knee. The synovial plica are membranes that separate the knee into compartments during fetal development.

  • OSGOOD-SCHALLATER DISEASE – Osgood-Schlatter disease is a disorder of the lower front of the knee where the large tendon under the kneecap (patellar tendon) attaches to the bone of the leg below.

  • OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS – Osteochondritis dissecans is a joint condition in which a piece of cartilage, along with a thin layer of the bone beneath it, comes loose from the end of a bone.

  • GOUT – Gout is a rheumatoid form of arthritis that causes the inflammation, joint pain and swelling especially in the toe, knee and ankle, also reducing their mobility.

  • SHIN SPLINT – Shin splints are a member of a group of injuries called “overuse injuries.” Shin splints occur most commonly in runners or aggressive walkers

When do you need to call us about your knee pain?

If you are unsure of the cause of your symptoms, or if you do not know the specific treatment recommendations for your condition, you should seek medical attention. Treatment of knee pain must be directed at the specific cause of your problem. Some signs that you should be seen by a doctor include:

  • Inability to walk comfortably on the affected side

  • Injury that causes deformity around the joint

  • Knee pain that occurs at night or while resting

  • Knee pain that persists beyond a few days

  • Locking (inability to bend) the knee

  • Swelling of the joint or the calf area

  • Signs of an infection, including fever, redness, warmth

  • Any other unusual symptoms

Treatments for Knee Pain

Treatment of knee pain depends entirely on the cause of the problem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that you understand the cause of your symptoms before embarking on a treatment program. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, or the severity of your condition, you should seek medical advice before beginning any treatment plan.

Read more about patient guide to knee pain

Read more about knee pain while running

Read more about knee pain causing by heavy weight

Read more about 9 tips to avoid knee pain and injuries

Read more about Meniscus Cartilage Tear

Who is Knee Specialist?

Knee specialist is an orthopaedic surgeon specialise in disorders of the knee. They deal with conditions such as knee arthritis, and damage to the knee ligaments. The operations and treatments that knee specialists offer include total and partial knee replacement, arthroscopic knee surgery, and knee ligament reconstruction (including anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction).

CURE YOUR KNEE PAIN TODAY. GET A KNEE SPECIALIST TO RULE OUT THE CAUSES AND CURE OF YOUR KNEE PAIN. CALL US +65 64712744 OR EMAIL INFO@BONECLINIC.COM.SG TO SCHEDULE FOR AN APPOINTMENT

Shoulder Pain Clinic

Are you frustrated with your Shoulder pain that is not getting better? Are you experiencing difficulty in moving your shoulder or raise your arm? You are in the right place! We certainly able to help with our innovative and non-invasive (non-surgical) form of treatment. Get your shoulder check today. Call us at (65) 64712744 to schedule for an appointment

Shoulder pain are one of the more common reasons for physician visits for musculoskeletal symptoms. The shoulder is the most movable joint in the body. However, it is an unstable joint because of the range of motion allowed. The injuries to the shoulder can, and do, cause a lot of pain. Usually the pain is related to a particular function or task but often times the pain becomes more prevalent throughout the day.

What most people call the shoulder is really several joints that combine with tendons and muscles to allow a wide range of motion in the arm from scratching your back to throwing the perfect pitch.

Mobility has its price, however. It may lead to increasing problems with instability or impingement of the soft tissue or bony structures in your shoulder, resulting in pain. You may feel pain only when you move your shoulder, or all of the time. The pain may be temporary or it may continue and require medical diagnosis and treatment.

This article explains some of the common causes of shoulder pain, as well as some general treatment options. Our doctor can give you more detailed information about your shoulder pain.

Some common Shoulder Pain conditions include:

  • BURSITIS / ROTATOR CUFF TENDONITIS – Rotator cuff tendonitis is an inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the tendons of the shoulder.

  • ROTATOR CUFF TEAR – The rotator cuff is made up of four muscles that help move and stabilize the shoulder joint. Damage to any one of the four muscles or their ligaments that attach the muscle to bone can occur because of acute injury, chronic overuse, or gradual aging.

  • FROZEN SHOULDER – is a condition that causes restriction of motion in the shoulder joint. The cause of a frozen shoulder is not well understood, but it often occurs for no known reason.

  • CALCIFIC TENDONITIS – Calcific tendonitis is a condition that causes the formation of a small, usually about 1-2 centimeter size, calcium deposit within the tendons of the rotator cuff.

  • SHOULDER INSTABILITY / DISLOCATION – Shoulder instability is a problem that occurs when the structures that surround the glenohumeral (shoulder) joint do not work to maintain the ball within its socket.

  • LABRAL TEAR – The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint, similar to the hip; however, the socket of the shoulder joint is extremely shallow, and thus inherently unstable.

  • SLAP LESION – A SLAP tear is an injury to a part of the shoulder joint called the labrum. The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint, similar to the hip; however, the socket of the shoulder joint is extremely shallow, and thus inherently unstable.

  • ARTHRITIS – Osteoarthritis is the most common type of shoulder arthritis. Also called wear-and-tear arthritis or degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis is characterized by progressive wearing away of the cartilage of the joint.

  • BICEPS TENDON RUPTURE – A biceps tendon rupture is an injury that occurs to the biceps tendon causing the attachment to separate from the bone. A normal biceps tendon is connected strongly to the bone

When do you need to call us about your shoulder pain?

If you are unsure of the cause of your shoulder pain, or if you do not know the specific treatment recommendations for your condition, you should seek medical attention. Treatment of these conditions must be directed at the specific cause of your problem. Some signs that you should be seen by a doctor include:

  • Inability to carry objects or use the arm

  • Injury that causes deformity of the joint

  • Shoulder pain that occurs at night or while resting

  • Shoulder pain that persists beyond a few days

  • Inability to raise the arm

  • Swelling or significant bruising around the joint or arm

  • Signs of an infection, including fever, redness, warmth

  • Any other unusual symptom

What are the best treatments for shoulder pain?

The treatment of shoulder pain depends entirely on the cause of the problem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that you understand the cause of your symptoms before embarking on a treatment program. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, or the severity of your condition, you should seek medical advice before beginning any treatment.

Read more about Shoulder AC Joint Injury

Read more about Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Read more about Rotator Cuff Injury

Read more about Biceps Rupture

Read more about Prevent and Treat Shoulder Injuries

Read more about Patient Guide to Shoulder Pain

Who is Shoulder Specialist?

Shoulder specialist is an orthopaedic surgeon who has advance experiences to treat condition such as arthritis, rotator cuff tear, shoulder instability, frozen shoulder and AC Joint problem.

Stop your Shoulder pain and Get it check today! Please call (65) 64712744 – 24 Hours / Email: info@boneclinic.com.sg for Appointment

Rotator Cuff Injury

When one or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the head of the humerus. Most tears occur in the supraspinatus muscle and tendon, but other parts of the rotator cuff may also be involved.

In many cases, torn tendons begin by fraying. As the damage progresses, the tendon can completely tear, sometimes with lifting a heavy object.

There are different types of tears.

  • Partial Tear. This type of tear damages the soft tissue, but does not completely sever it.
  • Full-Thickness Tear. This type of tear is also called a complete tear. It splits the soft tissue into two pieces. In many cases, tendons tear off where they attach to the head of the humerus. With a full-thickness tear, there is basically a hole in the tendon.

Cause

There are two main causes of rotator cuff tears: injury and degeneration.

Acute Tear

If you fall down on your outstretched arm or lift something too heavy with a jerking motion, you can tear your rotator cuff. This type of tear can occur with other shoulder injuries, such as a broken collarbone or dislocated shoulder.

Degenerative Tear

Most tears are the result of a wearing down of the tendon that occurs slowly over time. This degeneration naturally occurs as we age. Rotator cuff tears are more common in the dominant arm. If you have a degenerative tear in one shoulder, there is a greater risk for a rotator cuff tear in the opposite shoulder — even if you have no pain in that shoulder.

Several factors contribute to degenerative, or chronic, rotator cuff tears.

  • Repetitive stress. Repeating the same shoulder motions again and again can stress your rotator cuff muscles and tendons. Baseball, tennis, rowing, and weightlifting are examples of sports activities that can put you at risk for overuse tears. Many jobs and routine chores can cause overuse tears, as well.
  • Lack of blood supply. As we get older, the blood supply in our rotator cuff tendons lessens. Without a good blood supply, the body’s natural ability to repair tendon damage is impaired. This can ultimately lead to a tendon tear.
  • Bone spurs. As we age, bone spurs (bone overgrowth) often develop on the underside of the acromion bone. When we lift our arms, the spurs rub on the rotator cuff tendon. This condition is called shoulder impingement, and over time will weaken the tendon and make it more likely to tear.

Risk Factors

Because most rotator cuff tears are largely caused by the normal wear and tear that goes along with aging, people over 40 are at greater risk.

People who do repetitive lifting or overhead activities are also at risk for rotator cuff tears. Athletes are especially vulnerable to overuse tears, particularly tennis players and baseball pitchers. Painters, carpenters, and others who do overhead work also have a greater chance for tears.

Although overuse tears caused by sports activity or overhead work also occur in younger people, most tears in young adults are caused by a traumatic injury, like a fall.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms of a rotator cuff tear include:

  • Pain at rest and at night, particularly if lying on the affected shoulder
  • Pain when lifting and lowering your arm or with specific movements
  • Weakness when lifting or rotating your arm
  • Crepitus or crackling sensation when moving your shoulder in certain positions

Tears that happen suddenly, such as from a fall, usually cause intense pain. There may be a snapping sensation and immediate weakness in your upper arm.

A rotator cuff injury can make it painful to lift your arm out to the side.

Tears that develop slowly due to overuse also cause pain and arm weakness. You may have pain in the shoulder when you lift your arm to the side, or pain that moves down your arm. At first, the pain may be mild and only present when lifting your arm over your head, such as reaching into a cupboard. Over-the-counter medication, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, may relieve the pain at first.

Over time, the pain may become more noticeable at rest, and no longer goes away with medications. You may have pain when you lie on the painful side at night. The pain and weakness in the shoulder may make routine activities such as combing your hair or reaching behind your back more difficult.

Doctor Examination

Medical History and Physical Examination

Your doctor will test your range of motion by having you move your arm in different directions.

After discussing your symptoms and medical history, your doctor will examine your shoulder. He or she will check to see whether it is tender in any area or whether there is a deformity. To measure the range of motion of your shoulder, your doctor will have you move your arm in several different directions. He or she will also test your arm strength.

Your doctor will check for other problems with your shoulder joint. He or she may also examine your neck to make sure that the pain is not coming from a “pinched nerve,” and to rule out other conditions, such as arthritis.

Imaging Tests

Other tests which may help your doctor confirm your diagnosis include:

  • X-rays. The first imaging tests performed are usually x-rays. Because x-rays do not show the soft tissues of your shoulder like the rotator cuff, plain x-rays of a shoulder with rotator cuff pain are usually normal or may show a small bone spur.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound. These studies can better show soft tissues like the rotator cuff tendons. They can show the rotator cuff tear, as well as where the tear is located within the tendon and the size of the tear. An MRI can also give your doctor a better idea of how “old” or “new” a tear is because it can show the quality of the rotator cuff muscles.

Treatment

If you have a rotator cuff tear and you keep using it despite increasing pain, you may cause further damage. A rotator cuff tear can get larger over time.

Chronic shoulder and arm pain are good reasons to see your doctor. Early treatment can prevent your symptoms from getting worse. It will also get you back to your normal routine that much quicker.

The goal of any treatment is to reduce pain and restore function. There are several treatment options for a rotator cuff tear, and the best option is different for every person. In planning your treatment, your doctor will consider your age, activity level, general health, and the type of tear you have.

There is no evidence of better results from surgery performed near the time of injury versus later on. For this reason, many doctors first recommend nonsurgical management of rotator cuff tears.

Nonsurgical Treatment

In about 50% of patients, nonsurgical treatment relieves pain and improves function in the shoulder. Shoulder strength, however, does not usually improve without surgery.

Nonsurgical treatment options may include:

  • Rest. Your doctor may suggest rest and and limiting overhead activities. He or she may also prescribe a sling to help protect your shoulder and keep it still.
  • Activity modification. Avoid activities that cause shoulder pain.
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication. Drugs like ibuprofen and naproxen reduce pain and swelling.
  • Strengthening exercises and physical therapy. Specific exercises will restore movement and strengthen your shoulder. Your exercise program will include stretches to improve flexibility and range of motion. Strengthening the muscles that support your shoulder can relieve pain and prevent further injury.
  • Steroid injection. If rest, medications, and physical therapy do not relieve your pain, an injection of a local anesthetic and a cortisone preparation may be helpful. Cortisone is a very effective anti-inflammatory medicine.

The chief advantage of nonsurgical treatment is that it avoids the major risks of surgery, such as:

  • Infection
  • Permanent stiffness
  • Anesthesia complications
  • Sometimes lengthy recovery time

The disadvantages of nonsurgical treatment are:

  • No improvements in strength
  • Size of tear may increase over time
  • Activities may need to be limited

Surgical Treatment

Your doctor may recommend surgery if your pain does not improve with nonsurgical methods. Continued pain is the main indication for surgery. If you are very active and use your arms for overhead work or sports, your doctor may also suggest surgery.

Other signs that surgery may be a good option for you include:

  • Your symptoms have lasted 6 to 12 months
  • You have a large tear (more than 3 cm)
  • You have significant weakness and loss of function in your shoulder
  • Your tear was caused by a recent, acute injury

Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff most often involves re-attaching the tendon to the head of humerus (upper arm bone). There are a few options for repairing rotator cuff tears. Your orthopaedic surgeon will discuss with you the best procedure to meet your individual health needs.

Cure Your Rotator Cuff Injury today. Call us at +65 6471 2744 or Email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg for Appointment.

What condition is causing my neck pain?

There are many conditions that can cause chronic neck pain. The following information describes symptoms of some of the more common causes of chronic neck pain.

Neck Pain That Radiates Down the Arm

Pain that radiates down the arm, and possibly into the hands and fingers, is frequently caused by a cervical herniated disc or foraminal stenosis pinching a nerve in the neck.

The pain may be accompanied by numbness or tingling in the arms and/or hands. The symptoms may start suddenly or develop over time.

The approach to treatment for a cervical disc herniation is guided by how long the pain lasts, pain intensity and the degree to which the cervical nerve and/or spinal cord are affected.

Most commonly, the symptoms are temporary and can be treated successfully with nonsurgical care (such as medication, physical therapy, manipulations).

If the pain does not respond within 6 to 12 weeks of conservative treatments, then surgery may be recommended.

Neck Pain That Is Related to Certain Activities or Positions

Neck pain that develops slowly (often over a number of years) and tends to occur during or after certain activities or neck positions is frequently caused by cervical foraminal stenosis. Usually, impingement of one nerve root on one side of the spine causes most of the symptoms.

This type of spinal stenosis is caused by wear or aging related changes in the joints of the neck (facet joints) or at the margins of the discs. These changes may be diagnosed by either an MRI or a CT scan with a myelogram.

As with a herniated disc, the mainstay of treatment for stenosis is medical care (medicine, therapy, exercise, injections, etc.).

If the pain is severe or prolonged, or the functional impairment is sufficient, surgery may be recommended to open up the disc space and give the nerve root more room.

Cervical Radiculopathy

Arm Pain with Lack of Coordination

Pain that radiates down the arm, along with symptoms such as lack of coordination in the arms and legs, difficulty with fine motor skills, and occasional intermittent shooting pains, is commonly caused by cervical spinal stenosis with myelopathy.

These symptoms, which are caused by either a cervical herniated disc or degenerative changes in the joints that can cause pressure on the spinal cord, generally develop slowly.

Symptoms may not progress for years, and then the patient may notice progression of the coordination difficulties, only to be followed by another long period where there is no progression.

Conservative treatments may help relieve the chronic arm pain, but the definitive treatment option for the spinal cord compression (which causes the coordination difficulties) is surgery to decompress the spinal canal.

Neck Pain That Persists for More Than a Few Months and May Fluctuate

Neck pain that is often characterized by a low level of chronic pain that sometimes “flares” and gets worse, is made worse by certain positions or activities, and may be accompanied by arm pain, may indicate symptomatic cervical disc degeneration.

While cervical disc degeneration is virtually ubiquitous in humans, symptoms from this “gray hair of the spine” are less common and often short-lived.

However, there may be an event, such as a twisting injury to the disc space, which precipitates the onset of symptoms and, in a subset of such people, may lead to chronic neck pain. Such symptoms are often proportional to the person’s level of activity; that is, the more the shoulders, arms and neck are used, the more they hurt.

Neck Pain That Is Worse in the Morning and at the End of the Day

Paradoxically, there are also patients who feel their worst when they first rise in the morning and at the end of the day. These people often feel best when they are moving their neck, and they often prefer warm, sunny days to cool, rainy or overcast days.

Such symptoms parallel those experienced by patients with osteoarthritis of the weight-bearing joints (e.g., hips and knees). It is presumed that arthritic changes in the facet joints play a role in these people.

Degeneration in the cartilage of the facet joints can produce pain and tends to occur in older adults (over 60 years old).

The facet joints are designed to move against smooth surfaces, but as the cartilage degenerates it develops a lot of friction and there is accompanied loss of motion. Often the chronic pain is worst first thing in the morning.

Range of motion exercises, physical therapy, traction, and manipulations can all help preserve motion and lessen chronic pain.

In addition to the above conditions, there are a number of other less common cervical conditions. These cervical conditions can cause shoulder pain, wrist pain, elbow pain, or headaches.

Rule out the Causes, Prevention and Treatment for your Neck Pain today. Treat Neck Pain without Surgery. Call us at +65 64712744 or SMS to +65 92357641 (24Hrs) for Appointment.

Avascular Necrosis

Diagnosed with AVN (Avascular Necrosis)? You are at the Right Place. Get Professional opinion and treatment about your condition today. Call us +65 64712744 or SMS to +65 92357641 to schedule for an appointment.

Avascular necrosis is the death of bone tissue due to a lack of blood supply. Also called osteonecrosis, avascular necrosis can lead to tiny breaks in the bone and the bone’s eventual collapse.

The blood flow to a section of bone can be interrupted if the bone is fractured or the joint becomes dislocated. Avascular necrosis of bone is also associated with long-term use of high-dose steroid medications and excessive alcohol intake.

The hip is the joint most commonly affected by avascular necrosis. While avascular necrosis of bone can happen to anyone, it usually occurs in men between the ages of 30 and 60.

Avascular Necrosis

Avascular Necrosis

Symptoms:

Many people have no symptoms in the early stages of avascular necrosis of bone. As the disease worsens, your affected joint may hurt only when you put weight on it. Eventually, the joint may hurt even when you’re lying down.

Pain can be mild or severe and usually develops gradually. Joints most likely to be affected are the hip, shoulder, knee, hand and foot. Pain associated with avascular necrosis of the hip may be focused in the groin, thigh or buttock. Some people experience avascular necrosis bilaterally — for example, in both hips or in both knees.

When to see a doctor

See your doctor if you experience persistent pain in any joint. Seek immediate medical attention if you believe you have a broken bone or a dislocated joint.

Your risk of developing avascular necrosis can be increased by certain diseases, medical treatments or excessive drinking.

Excessive drinking

Several alcoholic drinks a day for several years can cause fatty deposits to form in your blood vessels. This can restrict the flow of blood to your bones. The more alcohol you habitually drink every day,  the higher your risk of avascular necrosis.

Medications

Certain types of medications can increase your risk of avascular necrosis. Examples include:

  • Steroids. Taken at high doses and for long periods of time, corticosteroids, such as prednisone, increase your risk of avascular necrosis. Like alcohol, these drugs may increase the amount of fat in your blood, leading to blockage of the small vessels feeding your bones. Doctors often prescribe high doses of corticosteroids for diseases such as vasculitis or lupus.
  • Osteoporosis drugs. People who take bisphosphonates — a type of medicine used to help strengthen bones weakened by osteoporosis — sometimes develop osteonecrosis of the jaw. This risk is higher for people who have received large doses of bisphosphonates intravenously to counteract the damage caused by cancer in the bones.

Medical conditions

Some underlying medical conditions increase your risk of developing avascular necrosis. They include:

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Lupus
  • Diabetes
  • Sickle cell anemia

Medical procedures

Several types of medical procedures increase your risk of avascular necrosis. Examples include:

  • Cancer treatments such as radiation
  • Dialysis, a process to clean the blood after kidney failure
  • Kidney and other organ transplants

Complications:

Avascular necrosis that goes untreated will worsen with time. Eventually the bone may become weakened enough that it collapses. When the bone loses its smooth shape, severe arthritis can result.

 Test and Diagnosis:

During the exam, your doctor will press around your joint, checking for tenderness. He or she may also move your joints through a variety of positions to see if your range of motion has been reduced.

Imaging tests

Many disorders can cause joint pain. Imaging tests can help pinpoint the proper diagnosis.

  • X-rays. In the early stages of avascular necrosis, X-rays usually appear normal. But X-rays can often reveal bone changes that occur in later stages of the disease.
  • Bone scan. For a bone scan, a small amount of radioactive material is injected into your vein. This material then travels to the parts of your bones that are injured or healing, and shows up as bright spots on the imaging plate.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI scans can show early changes in the bone that may indicate avascular necrosis. MRI uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field to produce detailed images of internal structures.

Treatments:

The treatment goal for avascular necrosis is to prevent further bone loss. What treatment you receive depends on the amount of bone damage you already have.

Medications

In some people, avascular necrosis symptoms may be reduced with medications such as:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).Medications such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) may help relieve the pain and inflammation associated with avascular necrosis.
  • Osteoporosis drugs. Some studies indicate that osteoporosis medications, such as alendronate (Fosamax, Binosto), may slow the progression of avascular necrosis.
  • Cholesterol drugs. Reducing the amount of fat (lipids) in your blood may help prevent the vessel blockages that often cause avascular necrosis.
  • Blood thinners. If you have a clotting disorder, blood thinners such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) may be prescribed to prevent clots in the vessels feeding your bones.

Therapy

In the early stages of avascular necrosis, your doctor might suggest:

  • Rest. Reducing the amount of weight and stress on your affected bone may slow the damage of avascular necrosis. You may need to restrict the amount of physical activity you engage in. In the case of hip or knee avascular necrosis, you may need to use crutches to keep weight off your joint for several months.
  • Exercises. Certain exercises may help you maintain or improve the range of motion in your joint. A physical therapist can choose exercises specifically for your condition and teach you how to do them.
  • Electrical stimulation. Electrical currents may encourage your body to grow new bone to replace the area damaged by avascular necrosis. Electrical stimulation can be used during surgery and applied directly to the damaged area. Or it can be administered through electrodes attached to your skin.

Surgical and other procedures

Because most people don’t start having symptoms until the disease is fairly advanced, you may need to consider surgeries such as:

  • Core decompression. In this operation, your surgeon removes part of the inner layer of your bone. In addition to reducing your pain, the extra space within your bone stimulates the production of healthy bone tissue and new blood vessels.
  • Bone transplant (graft). This procedure can help strengthen the area of bone affected by avascular necrosis The graft is a section of healthy bone taken from another part of your body.
  • Bone reshaping (osteotomy). This procedure removes a wedge of bone above or below a weight-bearing joint to help shift your weight off the damaged bone. Bone reshaping may allow you to postpone joint replacement.
  • Joint replacement. If your diseased bone has already collapsed or other treatment options aren’t helping, you may need surgery to replace the damaged parts of your joint with plastic or metal parts.

Prevention

It’s hard to tell if reducing your risk factors will help prevent avascular necrosis, but the following tips can also help improve your general health:

  • Limit alcohol. Heavy drinking is one of the top risk factors for developing avascular necrosis.
  • Keep cholesterol levels low. Tiny bits of fat (lipids) are the most common substance blocking blood supply to bones.
  • Monitor steroid use. Make sure your doctor knows about any past or present use of high-dose steroids. Steroid-related bone damage appears to worsen with repeated courses of high-dose steroids.

The treatment goal for avascular necrosis is to prevent further bone loss. What treatment you receive depends on the amount of bone damage you already have.

Get Professional Opinion and Management about Avascular Necrosis (AVN). Call us at +65 64712744 or Email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg for Appointment.

Back Pain Clinic

Are you frustrated with your Lower back pain that is not getting better? Are you experiencing difficulty in standing up after prolong sitting, unable to straighten your back? Feeling numbness to your leg? You are in the right place! We certainly able to help with our innovative and non-invasive (non-surgical) form of treatment. Get your spine check today. Call us at (65) 6471 2744 or Email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg to schedule for an appointment.

Lower back pain is one of the main reasons Singaporean visit their doctor. For adults over 40, it ranks third as a cause for doctor visits, after heart disease and arthritis. Eighty percent of people will have low back pain at some point in their lives. And nearly everyone who has low back pain once will have it again.

Very few people who feel pain in their lower back have a serious medical problem. Ninety percent of people who experience low back pain for the first time get better in two to six weeks. Only rarely do people with low back pain develop chronic back problems.

With these facts in mind, you can be assured that back pain is common, that it usually only causes problems for a short period of time, and that you can take steps to ease symptoms and prevent future problems.

Symptoms of Lower Back Pain:

  • The pain may radiate down the front, side, or back of your leg, or it may be confined to the low back
  • The pain may become worse with activity.
  • Occasionally, the pain may be worse at night or with prolonged sitting such as on a long car trip.
  • You may have numbness or weakness in the part of the leg that receives its nerve supply from a compressed nerve.
    • An example of this would be an inability to plantar flex the foot. This means you would be unable to stand on your toes or bring your foot downward. This occurs when the first sacral nerve is compressed or injured.
    • Another example would be the inability to raise your big toe upward. This results when the fifth lumbar nerve is compromised.

Causes of Low Back Pain

Why do I have low back pain?

There are many causes of low back pain. Doctors are not always able to pinpoint the source of a patient’s pain. But our doctor will make every effort to ensure that your symptoms are not from a serious medical cause, such as cancer or a spinal infection.

The vast majority of back problems are a result of wear and tear on the parts of the spine over many years. This process is called degeneration. Over time, the normal process of aging can result in degenerative changes in all parts of the spine.

Injuries to the spine, such as a fracture or injury to the disc, can make the changes happen even faster. There is strong evidence that cigarette smoking also speeds up degeneration of the spine. Scientists have found links among family members, showing that genetics plays a role in how fast these changes occur.

Degeneration

The intervertebral disc changes over time. At first, the disc is spongy and firm. The nucleus in the center of the disc contains a great deal of water. This gives the disc its ability to absorb shock and protect the spine from heavy and repeated forces.

The first change that occurs is that the annulus around the nucleus weakens and begins to develop small cracks and tears. The body tries to heal the cracks with scar tissue. But scar tissue is not as strong as the tissue it replaces. The torn annulus can be a source of pain for two reasons. First, there are pain sensors in the outer rim of the annulus. They signal a painful response when the tear reaches the outer edge of the annulus. Second, like injuries to other tissues in the body, a tear in the annulus can cause pain due to inflammation.

With time, the disc begins to lose water, causing it to lose some of its fullness and height. As a result, the vertebrae begin to move closer together.

As the disc continues to degenerate, the space between the vertebrae shrinks. This compresses the facet joints along the back of the spinal column. As these joints are forced together, extra pressure builds on the articular cartilage on the surface of the facet joints. This extra pressure can damage the facet joints. Over time, this may lead to arthritis in the facet joints.

These degenerative changes in the disc, facet joints, and ligaments cause the spinal segment to become loose and unstable. The extra movement causes even more wear and tear on the spine. As a result, more and larger tears occur in the annulus.

Mechanical and Neurogenic Pain

To best understand the cause of your pain, spine specialists sometimes divide low back pain into two categories:

  • mechanical pain – caused by wear and tear in the parts of lumbar spine.
  • neurogenic pain – occurs when spinal nerves are inflamed, squeezed or pinched.

Spine Conditions

The effects of spine degeneration or back injury can lead to specific spine conditions. These include

  • annular tears
  • internal disc disruption
  • herniated disc
  • facet joint arthritis
  • segmental instability
  • spinal stenosis
  • foraminal stenosis

Symptoms

What are some of the symptoms of low back problems?

Symptoms from low back problems vary. They depend on a person’s condition and which structures are affected. Some of the more common symptoms of low back problems are

  • low back pain
  • pain spreading into the buttocks and thighs
  • pain radiating from the buttock to the foot
  • back stiffness and reduced range of motion
  • muscle weakness in the hip, thigh, leg, or foot
  • sensory changes (numbness, prickling, or tingling) in the leg, foot, or toes

Rarely, symptoms involve changes in bowel or bladder function. A large disc herniation that pushes straight back into the spinal canal can put pressure on the nerves that go to the bowels and bladder. The pressure may cause symptoms of low back pain, pain running down the back of both legs, and numbness or tingling between the legs in the area you would contact if you were seated on a saddle. The pressure on the nerves can cause a loss of control in the bowels or bladder.

If the pressure isn’t relieved, it can lead to permanent paralysis of the bowels and bladder. This condition is called cauda equina syndrome. Doctors recommend immediate surgery to remove pressure from the nerves.

 

 

Diagnosis

How will my doctor find out what’s causing my problem?

The diagnosis of low back problems begins with a thorough history of your condition. You might be asked to fill out a questionnaire describing your back problems. Our doctor will ask you questions to find out when you first started having problems, what makes your symptoms worse or better, and how the symptoms affect your daily activity. Your answers will help guide the physical examination.

Our doctor will then physically examine the muscles and joints of your low back. It is important that our doctor see how your back is aligned, how it moves, and exactly where it hurts.

Our doctor may do some simple tests to check the function of the nerves. These tests are used to measure the strength in your lower limbs, check your reflexes, and determine whether you have numbness in your legs or feet.

The information from your medical history and physical examination will help our doctor decide which further tests to run. The tests give different types of information.

Radiological Imaging

Radiological imaging tests help your doctor see the anatomy of your spine. There are several kinds of imaging tests that are commonly used.

X-rays

X-rays show problems with bones, such as infection, bone tumors, or fractures. X-rays of the spine also can give your doctor information about how much degeneration has occurred in the spine, such as the amount of space in the neural foramina and between the discs. X-rays are usually the first test ordered before any of the more specialized tests.

MRI Scans

The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses magnetic waves to create pictures of the lumbar spine in slices. The MRI scan shows the lumbar spine bones as well as the soft tissue structures such as the discs, joints, and nerves. MRI scans are painless and don’t require needles or dye. The MRI scan has become the most common test to look at the lumbar spine after X-rays have been taken.

Treatment

What can be done to relieve my symptoms?

Ninety percent of people who experience low back pain for the first time get better in two to six weeks without any treatment at all. Patients often do best when encouraged to stay active and to get back to normal activities as soon as possible, even if there is still some pain. The pain may not go away completely. One goal of treatment is to help you find ways to control the pain and allow you to continue to do your normal activities.

Nonsurgical Treatment

Whenever possible, doctors prefer to use treatments other than surgery. The first goal of these nonsurgical treatments is to ease your pain and other symptoms.

Bed Rest

In cases of severe pain, doctors may suggest a short period of bed rest, usually no more than two days. Lying on your back can take pressure off sore discs and nerves. Most doctors advise against strict bed rest and prefer that patients do ordinary activities using pain to gauge how much is too much.

Back Brace

A back support belt is sometimes recommended when back pain first strikes. It can help provide support and lower the pressure inside a problem disc. Patients are encouraged to gradually discontinue wearing the support belt over a period of two to four days. Otherwise, back muscles begin to rely on the belt and start to shrink (atrophy).

Medications

Many different types of medications are typically prescribed to help gain control of the symptoms of low back pain. There is no medication that will cure low back pain. Medications are prescribed to help with sleep disturbances and to help control pain, inflammation, and muscle spasm.

Physical Therapy and Exercise

In addition to other nonsurgical treatments, doctors often ask their patients to work with a physical therapist. Therapy treatments focus on relieving pain, improving back movement, and fostering healthy posture. A therapist can design a rehabilitation program to address a particular condition and to help the patient prevent future problems. There is a great deal of scientific proof that exercise and increased overall fitness reduce the risk of developing back pain and can improve the symptoms of back pain once it begins.

Injections

Spinal injections are used for both treatment and diagnostic purposes. There are several different types of spinal injections that your doctor may suggest.

Some injections are more difficult to perform and require the use of a fluoroscope. A fluoroscope is a special type of X-ray that allows the doctor to see an X-ray picture continuously on a TV screen. The fluoroscope is used to guide the needle into the correct place before the injection is given.

Surgery

Only rarely is lumbar spine surgery scheduled right away. Our doctor may suggest immediate surgery if you are losing control of your bowels and bladder or if your muscles are becoming weaker very rapidly.

For other conditions, doctors prefer to try nonsurgical treatments for a minimum of three months before considering surgery. Most people with back pain tend to get better, not worse. Even people who have degenerative spine changes tend to gradually improve with time. Only one to three percent of patients with degenerative lumbar conditions typically require surgery. Surgery may be suggested when severe pain is not improving.

There are many different operations for back pain. The goal of nearly all spine operations is to remove pressure from the nerves of the spine, stop excessive motion between two or more vertebrae, or both. The type of surgery that is best depends on that patient’s conditions and symptoms.

Laminectomy

The lamina is the covering layer of the bony ring of the spinal canal. It forms a roof-like structure over the back of the spinal column. When the nerves in the spinal canal are being squeezed by a herniated disc or from bone spurs pushing into the canal, a laminectomy removes part or all of the lamina to release pressure on the spinal nerves.

Discectomy

When the intervertebral disc has ruptured, the portion that has ruptured into the spinal canal may put pressure on the nerve roots. This may cause pain, weakness, and numbness that radiates into one or both legs. The operation to remove the portion of the disc that is pressing on the nerve roots is called a discectomy. This operation is performed through an incision in the low back immediately over the disc that has ruptured.

Many spine surgeons now perform discectomy procedures that require only small incisions in the low back (minimally invasive). The advantage of these minimally invasive procedures is less damage to the muscles of the back and a quicker recovery. Many surgeons are now performing minimally invasive discectomy as an outpatient procedure.

Read more about Microdiscectomy or Microdecompression Surgery

Rehabilitation

What should I expect after treatment?

Non-surgical Rehabilitation

For acute back pain, you may be prescribed two to four weeks of physical therapy. You might need to continue therapy for two to four months for chronic back problems. Treatments are designed to ease pain and to improve your mobility, strength, posture, and function. You’ll also learn how to control your symptoms and how to protect your spine for the years ahead.

 

 

 

Read more about Prevention of Lower Back Pain

Read more about Back Problems

Get your Professional Treatment and Advice on your Lower Back Pain, Call +65 6471 2744 for Appointment / Email to: info@boneclinic.com.sg for Appointment

Dangerous Sports in Kids

What are some common forms of sports injury that kids in Singapore experience (e.g. fractures, concussions, and trauma)? Do provide statistics of these injury cases happening in Singapore, in recent years. How are these sports injury usually treated?

There are 2 most common injury in kids:

1. Bone Fracture

Depending on the severity of the fracture, the treatment is ranging from Splint, Cast/Plaster, and Surgery.

2. Ankle sprained

Sprained ankle is very common injury for kids, and the treatment is depending on the grades of the sprain. Most of the time it is treated with Cast or Ankle Air Cast in order to allow the ligament to heal properly. Tubigrip is also often used to reduce the swelling.

ACL Injury

Share with us the 5 most dangerous sports for kids. What is it about these sports that make them dangerous? Anything that kids/parents/teachers can do to keep the rate of accidents and injuries low?

1. Basketball

Basketball Game involving with twisting, jumping, pivoting, squatting, or making sudden stops puts kids at risk. Proper coach up can help to keep the rate of injuries low. Basketball Shoes which covered above ankle will help to protect the ankles.

2. Cycling

Wearing a helmet, elbow and knee guards greatly reduces risk as does educating children about the dangers of riding in traffic.

3. Soccer

Soccer-playing boys are at highest risk for ankle sprains as well as thigh and upper leg strains and knee injuries such as ACL and Meniscus Injuries. Proper coach up can help to keep the rate of injuries low.

4. Baseball

Baseball injuries caused by being hit by a batted ball, four in 10 caused fractures, lacerations, or concussions. There are even reports of sustaining a coma from a batted ball and haemorrhaging in the brain after being hit by a bat. Baseball has also the highest injury rate in elbows, mostly due to repetitive pitching and improper technique. Wear proper protective gear will help in reduce the rate of injuries.

5. Skateboarding

You are on a piece of wood with sandpaper and wheels. Doing tricks off ledges sometimes higher than 15 feet. The use of protective gear, such as closed, slip-resistant shoes, helmets, and specially designed padding for elbows, knees, and hands is helping to reduce the rate of injuries such as wrist fracture, elbow fracture, and clavicle fracture.

What’s the first thing to be done when someone gets hurt while playing sports?

Ans: Depending on the severity of the injury:

1. For severe cases and injured person no response: Call for help. Eg: 995

–          Check on ABC (Airway, Breathing and Circulation)

2. For non-severe cases:

–          In the event of bleeding – is to stop the bleeding but putting pressure on the affected area

–          In the event of fracture or soft tissue – is to put a splint to reduce the pain

–          Bring the injured patient to nearest A&E or GP

Having Sports Injuries? You are at the Right Place. Consult our Sports Specialist today. Call us +65 64712744 or SMS to +65 92357641 to schedule for an appointment. 

Tips to Manage Low Back Pain at Home

Perhaps you bent the wrong way while lifting something heavy. Or you’re dealing with a degenerative condition like arthritis. Whatever the cause, once you have low back pain, it can be hard to shake. About one in four say they’ve had a recent bout of low back pain. And almost everyone can expect to experience back pain at some point in their lives.

Sometimes it’s clearly serious: You were injured, or you feel numbness, weakness, or tingling in the legs. Call the doctor, of course. But for routine and mild low back pain, here are a few simple tips to try at home.

Spinal Stenosis

Chill it. Ice is best in the first 24 to 48 hours after an injury because it reduces inflammation. “Even though the warmth feels good because it helps cover up the pain and it does help relax the muscles, the heat actually inflames the inflammatory processes,” she says. After 48 hours, you can switch to heat if you prefer. Whether you use heat or ice — take it off after about 20 minutes to give your skin a rest. If pain persists, talk with a doctor.

Keep moving. “Our spines are like the rest of our body — they’re meant to move. Keep doing your daily activities. Make the beds, go to work, walk the dog. Once you’re feeling better, regular aerobic exercises like swimming, bicycling, and walking can keep you — and your back — more mobile. Just don’t overdo it. There’s no need to run a marathon when your back is sore.

Stay strong. Once your low back pain has receded, you can help avert future episodes of back pain by working the muscles that support your lower back, including the back extensor muscles. “They help you maintain the proper posture and alignment of your spine. Having strong hip, pelvic, and abdominal muscles also gives you more back support. Avoid abdominal crunches, because they can actually put more strain on your back.

Stretch. Don’t sit slumped in your desk chair all day. Get up every 20 minutes or so and stretch the other way. Because most of us spend a lot of time bending forward in our jobs, it’s important to stand up and stretch backward throughout the day. Don’t forget to also stretch your legs. Some people find relief from their back pain by doing a regular stretching routine, like yoga.

Think ergonomically. Design your workspace so you don’t have to hunch forward to see your computer monitor or reach way out for your mouse. Use a desk chair that supports your lower back and allows you to keep your feet planted firmly on the floor.

Watch your posture. Slumping makes it harder for your back to support your weight. Be especially careful of your posture when lifting heavy objects. Never bend over from the waist. Instead, bend and straighten from the knees.

Wear low heels. Exchange your four-inch pumps for flats or low heels (less than 1 inch). High heels create a more unstable posture, and increase pressure on your lower spine. According to research, nearly 60% of women who consistently wear high-heeled shoes complain of low back pain.

Kick the habit. Smoking can increase your risk for osteoporosis of the spine and other bone problems. Osteoporosis can lead to compression fractures of the spine. One study found that smokers are about a third more likely to have low back pain compared with nonsmokers.

Watch your weight. Use diet and exercise to keep your weight within a healthy range for your height. Being overweight puts excess stress on your spine.

Try an over-the-counter pain reliever. Anti-inflammatory drugs can help reduce back pain. Be sure to check with your doctor or pharmacist about any interactions over-the-counter pain relievers may have with other medications you are taking. People with a history of certain medical conditions (such as ulcers, kidney disease, and liver disease) should avoid some medicines.

Call your doctor if:

  • Your low back pain doesn’t go away after a few days, and it hurts even when you’re at rest or lying down.
  • You have weakness or numbness in your legs, or you have trouble standing or walking
  • You lose control over your bowels or bladder

These could be signs that you have a nerve problem or another underlying medical condition that needs to be treated.

STOP YOUR BACK PAIN TODAY! CALL US AT +65 6471 2744 or EMAIL TO: info@boneclinic.com.sg FOR APPOINTMENT

Call Now ButtonCall us (24 Hrs)
WhatsApp chat